Rape - definition of rape by The Free Dictionary
A hideous crime is committed at a fashionable London society gathering. The victim is the beautiful, innocent Belinda, her attacker is the dastardly Baron, and his weapon of choice is a pair of scissors...All content on this website, including dictionary,

A hideous crime is committed at a fashionable London society gathering. The victim is the beautiful, innocent Belinda, her attacker is the dastardly Baron, and his weapon of choice is a pair of scissors...

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

late 14c., "seize prey; abduct, take by force," from rape (n.) and from Anglo-French raper (Old French rapir ) "to seize, abduct," a legal term, probably from past participle of Latin rapere "seize, carry off by force, abduct" (see rapid ).

Latin rapere was used for "sexually violate," but only very rarely; the usual Latin word being stuprare "to defile, ravish, violate," related to stuprum (n.), literally "disgrace." Meaning "to abduct (a woman), ravish;" also "seduce (a man)" is from early 15c. in English. Related: Raped ; raping . Uncertain connection to Low German and Dutch rapen in the same sense.

kind of cruciferous plant ( Brassica napus ), late 14c., from Old French rape , from Latin rapa, rapum "turnip," from PIE *rap- (cf. Greek hrapys "rape," Old Church Slavonic repa , Lithuanian rope , Middle Dutch roeve , Old High German ruoba , German Rübe "rape, turnip"). Usually grown to feed sheep, an oil made from it is used in cooking (see canola ).

early 14c., "booty, prey;" mid-14c., "forceful seizure; plundering, robbery, extortion," from Anglo-French rap , rape , and directly from Latin rapere "seize" (see rape (v.)). Meaning "act of abducting a woman or sexually violating her or both" is from early 15c., but perhaps late 13c. in Anglo-Latin.

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Alexander Pope (21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744) was an 18th-century English poet. He is best known for his satirical verse, his translation of Homer and for his use of the heroic couplet . He is the second-most frequently quoted writer in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations after Shakespeare . [1]

At Binfield, he also began to make many important friends. One of them, John Caryll (the future dedicatee of The Rape of the Lock ), was twenty years older than the poet and had made many acquaintances in the London literary world. He introduced the young Pope to the ageing playwright William Wycherley and to William Walsh, a minor poet, who helped Pope revise his first major work, The Pastorals . He also met the Blount sisters, Teresa and Martha , both of whom would remain lifelong friends. [5]

In May, 1709, Pope's Pastorals was published in the sixth part of Tonson's Poetical Miscellanies . This brought Pope instant fame, and was followed by An Essay on Criticism , published in May 1711, which was equally well received.

Rain and wind early...then remaining cloudy with showers in the afternoon. High 48F. SSE winds at 20 to 30 mph, decreasing to 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 80%. Winds could occasionally gust over 40 mph..

Rain showers early will evolve into a more steady rain overnight. Low near 40F. Winds SSE at 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 90%.

Two men were arrested Thursday on suspicion of rape and voyeurism offenses that allegedly occurred just outside of Ilwaco.

A hideous crime is committed at a fashionable London society gathering. The victim is the beautiful, innocent Belinda, her attacker is the dastardly Baron, and his weapon of choice is a pair of scissors...

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

late 14c., "seize prey; abduct, take by force," from rape (n.) and from Anglo-French raper (Old French rapir ) "to seize, abduct," a legal term, probably from past participle of Latin rapere "seize, carry off by force, abduct" (see rapid ).

Latin rapere was used for "sexually violate," but only very rarely; the usual Latin word being stuprare "to defile, ravish, violate," related to stuprum (n.), literally "disgrace." Meaning "to abduct (a woman), ravish;" also "seduce (a man)" is from early 15c. in English. Related: Raped ; raping . Uncertain connection to Low German and Dutch rapen in the same sense.

kind of cruciferous plant ( Brassica napus ), late 14c., from Old French rape , from Latin rapa, rapum "turnip," from PIE *rap- (cf. Greek hrapys "rape," Old Church Slavonic repa , Lithuanian rope , Middle Dutch roeve , Old High German ruoba , German Rübe "rape, turnip"). Usually grown to feed sheep, an oil made from it is used in cooking (see canola ).

early 14c., "booty, prey;" mid-14c., "forceful seizure; plundering, robbery, extortion," from Anglo-French rap , rape , and directly from Latin rapere "seize" (see rape (v.)). Meaning "act of abducting a woman or sexually violating her or both" is from early 15c., but perhaps late 13c. in Anglo-Latin.

Adobe Reader, or equivalent, is required to view PDF files. Click the "Get Adobe Reader" image to get a free download of the reader from Adobe.

Alexander Pope (21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744) was an 18th-century English poet. He is best known for his satirical verse, his translation of Homer and for his use of the heroic couplet . He is the second-most frequently quoted writer in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations after Shakespeare . [1]

At Binfield, he also began to make many important friends. One of them, John Caryll (the future dedicatee of The Rape of the Lock ), was twenty years older than the poet and had made many acquaintances in the London literary world. He introduced the young Pope to the ageing playwright William Wycherley and to William Walsh, a minor poet, who helped Pope revise his first major work, The Pastorals . He also met the Blount sisters, Teresa and Martha , both of whom would remain lifelong friends. [5]

In May, 1709, Pope's Pastorals was published in the sixth part of Tonson's Poetical Miscellanies . This brought Pope instant fame, and was followed by An Essay on Criticism , published in May 1711, which was equally well received.

A hideous crime is committed at a fashionable London society gathering. The victim is the beautiful, innocent Belinda, her attacker is the dastardly Baron, and his weapon of choice is a pair of scissors...

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

A hideous crime is committed at a fashionable London society gathering. The victim is the beautiful, innocent Belinda, her attacker is the dastardly Baron, and his weapon of choice is a pair of scissors...

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

late 14c., "seize prey; abduct, take by force," from rape (n.) and from Anglo-French raper (Old French rapir ) "to seize, abduct," a legal term, probably from past participle of Latin rapere "seize, carry off by force, abduct" (see rapid ).

Latin rapere was used for "sexually violate," but only very rarely; the usual Latin word being stuprare "to defile, ravish, violate," related to stuprum (n.), literally "disgrace." Meaning "to abduct (a woman), ravish;" also "seduce (a man)" is from early 15c. in English. Related: Raped ; raping . Uncertain connection to Low German and Dutch rapen in the same sense.

kind of cruciferous plant ( Brassica napus ), late 14c., from Old French rape , from Latin rapa, rapum "turnip," from PIE *rap- (cf. Greek hrapys "rape," Old Church Slavonic repa , Lithuanian rope , Middle Dutch roeve , Old High German ruoba , German Rübe "rape, turnip"). Usually grown to feed sheep, an oil made from it is used in cooking (see canola ).

early 14c., "booty, prey;" mid-14c., "forceful seizure; plundering, robbery, extortion," from Anglo-French rap , rape , and directly from Latin rapere "seize" (see rape (v.)). Meaning "act of abducting a woman or sexually violating her or both" is from early 15c., but perhaps late 13c. in Anglo-Latin.

Adobe Reader, or equivalent, is required to view PDF files. Click the "Get Adobe Reader" image to get a free download of the reader from Adobe.

A hideous crime is committed at a fashionable London society gathering. The victim is the beautiful, innocent Belinda, her attacker is the dastardly Baron, and his weapon of choice is a pair of scissors...

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

late 14c., "seize prey; abduct, take by force," from rape (n.) and from Anglo-French raper (Old French rapir ) "to seize, abduct," a legal term, probably from past participle of Latin rapere "seize, carry off by force, abduct" (see rapid ).

Latin rapere was used for "sexually violate," but only very rarely; the usual Latin word being stuprare "to defile, ravish, violate," related to stuprum (n.), literally "disgrace." Meaning "to abduct (a woman), ravish;" also "seduce (a man)" is from early 15c. in English. Related: Raped ; raping . Uncertain connection to Low German and Dutch rapen in the same sense.

kind of cruciferous plant ( Brassica napus ), late 14c., from Old French rape , from Latin rapa, rapum "turnip," from PIE *rap- (cf. Greek hrapys "rape," Old Church Slavonic repa , Lithuanian rope , Middle Dutch roeve , Old High German ruoba , German Rübe "rape, turnip"). Usually grown to feed sheep, an oil made from it is used in cooking (see canola ).

early 14c., "booty, prey;" mid-14c., "forceful seizure; plundering, robbery, extortion," from Anglo-French rap , rape , and directly from Latin rapere "seize" (see rape (v.)). Meaning "act of abducting a woman or sexually violating her or both" is from early 15c., but perhaps late 13c. in Anglo-Latin.

A hideous crime is committed at a fashionable London society gathering. The victim is the beautiful, innocent Belinda, her attacker is the dastardly Baron, and his weapon of choice is a pair of scissors...

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