Scouts - Orienteering, Geocaching, GPS, Map & Compass
The Scout Outdoor Centre’s store on Rundle Street in the Adelaide CBD has thousands more products that aren’t yet online. If there is something you need but can’t find it here chances are we can get it for you. Send us an email or give

The Scout Outdoor Centre’s store on Rundle Street in the Adelaide CBD has thousands more products that aren’t yet online. If there is something you need but can’t find it here chances are we can get it for you. Send us an email or give us a call so we can help you find the product you are after.

Although we do physically keep the majority of the products found on this site, we cannot guarantee all products will be found in store.

If you intend to purchase items in store after viewing this site, please email or call (08 8223 5544) us first to confirm price and availability (email monitored Mon-Fri, 9-5.30).

I note in the "GPS - A Scouting Skill" thread that schleining says that his troop uses lensatic compasses, which surprises me. I encourage Scouts to outfit themselves with an inexpensive orienteering style compass if they ask, which can be had at Walmart for about $6.00.

A conventional compass with a swinging needle above a compass dial will work OK, even a toy compass. Of course it lacks the advantages of the orienteering style compass, but those aren't essential for hiking and camping.

A lensatic compass has a sighting system and magnifying glass that allows improved accuracy in taking bearings, and is/was commonly used by the military. But while it gives better accuracy in taking a bearing, it, too, lacks the advantages of an orienteering style compass. And those advantages are far more useful for Scouting purposes than more accurate bearings, in my experience.

The Scout Outdoor Centre’s store on Rundle Street in the Adelaide CBD has thousands more products that aren’t yet online. If there is something you need but can’t find it here chances are we can get it for you. Send us an email or give us a call so we can help you find the product you are after.

Although we do physically keep the majority of the products found on this site, we cannot guarantee all products will be found in store.

If you intend to purchase items in store after viewing this site, please email or call (08 8223 5544) us first to confirm price and availability (email monitored Mon-Fri, 9-5.30).

I note in the "GPS - A Scouting Skill" thread that schleining says that his troop uses lensatic compasses, which surprises me. I encourage Scouts to outfit themselves with an inexpensive orienteering style compass if they ask, which can be had at Walmart for about $6.00.

A conventional compass with a swinging needle above a compass dial will work OK, even a toy compass. Of course it lacks the advantages of the orienteering style compass, but those aren't essential for hiking and camping.

A lensatic compass has a sighting system and magnifying glass that allows improved accuracy in taking bearings, and is/was commonly used by the military. But while it gives better accuracy in taking a bearing, it, too, lacks the advantages of an orienteering style compass. And those advantages are far more useful for Scouting purposes than more accurate bearings, in my experience.

The map and compass are essential tools you would want to keep in your backpack. Together, these tools can help you navigate unfamiliar terrain. Using the compass is a specialized skill that requires practice and good understanding of how the compass works. The compass and the map put together can provide you with valuable information while hiking or backpacking. When properly used, these tools can lead you to water, point you to the correct trail at the fork, can be used to evaluate distances and pinpoint your location in case of an emergency.

Most people I know, carry a map and a compass in their backpack when trekking in the wilderness, why wouldn’t you?  At the same time 9 out of 10 don’t know how to use them correctly. I prefer to use a plain old low-tech compass to a smart phone or a GPS.  My cheap $6 to $10-dollar compass requires no batteries and it relies on the Earth’s magnetic field to help me find directions.  Low-tech, low-cost and low-maintenance.

In this series of articles, we will go over the basics of using the compass and applying that knowledge to navigate unfamiliar terrain with a map.

The skill to know where you are and where you are heading is an important one! The resources below should help you learn the basic principles of map and compass work.

The Scout Outdoor Centre’s store on Rundle Street in the Adelaide CBD has thousands more products that aren’t yet online. If there is something you need but can’t find it here chances are we can get it for you. Send us an email or give us a call so we can help you find the product you are after.

Although we do physically keep the majority of the products found on this site, we cannot guarantee all products will be found in store.

If you intend to purchase items in store after viewing this site, please email or call (08 8223 5544) us first to confirm price and availability (email monitored Mon-Fri, 9-5.30).

I note in the "GPS - A Scouting Skill" thread that schleining says that his troop uses lensatic compasses, which surprises me. I encourage Scouts to outfit themselves with an inexpensive orienteering style compass if they ask, which can be had at Walmart for about $6.00.

A conventional compass with a swinging needle above a compass dial will work OK, even a toy compass. Of course it lacks the advantages of the orienteering style compass, but those aren't essential for hiking and camping.

A lensatic compass has a sighting system and magnifying glass that allows improved accuracy in taking bearings, and is/was commonly used by the military. But while it gives better accuracy in taking a bearing, it, too, lacks the advantages of an orienteering style compass. And those advantages are far more useful for Scouting purposes than more accurate bearings, in my experience.

The map and compass are essential tools you would want to keep in your backpack. Together, these tools can help you navigate unfamiliar terrain. Using the compass is a specialized skill that requires practice and good understanding of how the compass works. The compass and the map put together can provide you with valuable information while hiking or backpacking. When properly used, these tools can lead you to water, point you to the correct trail at the fork, can be used to evaluate distances and pinpoint your location in case of an emergency.

Most people I know, carry a map and a compass in their backpack when trekking in the wilderness, why wouldn’t you?  At the same time 9 out of 10 don’t know how to use them correctly. I prefer to use a plain old low-tech compass to a smart phone or a GPS.  My cheap $6 to $10-dollar compass requires no batteries and it relies on the Earth’s magnetic field to help me find directions.  Low-tech, low-cost and low-maintenance.

In this series of articles, we will go over the basics of using the compass and applying that knowledge to navigate unfamiliar terrain with a map.

The skill to know where you are and where you are heading is an important one! The resources below should help you learn the basic principles of map and compass work.

Photos taken from inside the home will show which way rooms face and the potential sunlight at different times of the day

If you're searching for land to build a new home, take photos in compass mode to show what aspect the property can have

Solocator is a camera app with built-in compass features. You can take photos with compass reading showing the direction you’re looking at or switch to building mode to capture the elevation of a building face. The building mode captures the Cardinal and InterCardinal directions such as North Elevation, South East Elevation etc. You can easily email photos from the app with compass bearing, house elevation, the time taken, GPS coordinates and links to iOS maps or Google maps.

The Scout Outdoor Centre’s store on Rundle Street in the Adelaide CBD has thousands more products that aren’t yet online. If there is something you need but can’t find it here chances are we can get it for you. Send us an email or give us a call so we can help you find the product you are after.

Although we do physically keep the majority of the products found on this site, we cannot guarantee all products will be found in store.

If you intend to purchase items in store after viewing this site, please email or call (08 8223 5544) us first to confirm price and availability (email monitored Mon-Fri, 9-5.30).

The Scout Outdoor Centre’s store on Rundle Street in the Adelaide CBD has thousands more products that aren’t yet online. If there is something you need but can’t find it here chances are we can get it for you. Send us an email or give us a call so we can help you find the product you are after.

Although we do physically keep the majority of the products found on this site, we cannot guarantee all products will be found in store.

If you intend to purchase items in store after viewing this site, please email or call (08 8223 5544) us first to confirm price and availability (email monitored Mon-Fri, 9-5.30).

I note in the "GPS - A Scouting Skill" thread that schleining says that his troop uses lensatic compasses, which surprises me. I encourage Scouts to outfit themselves with an inexpensive orienteering style compass if they ask, which can be had at Walmart for about $6.00.

A conventional compass with a swinging needle above a compass dial will work OK, even a toy compass. Of course it lacks the advantages of the orienteering style compass, but those aren't essential for hiking and camping.

A lensatic compass has a sighting system and magnifying glass that allows improved accuracy in taking bearings, and is/was commonly used by the military. But while it gives better accuracy in taking a bearing, it, too, lacks the advantages of an orienteering style compass. And those advantages are far more useful for Scouting purposes than more accurate bearings, in my experience.

The map and compass are essential tools you would want to keep in your backpack. Together, these tools can help you navigate unfamiliar terrain. Using the compass is a specialized skill that requires practice and good understanding of how the compass works. The compass and the map put together can provide you with valuable information while hiking or backpacking. When properly used, these tools can lead you to water, point you to the correct trail at the fork, can be used to evaluate distances and pinpoint your location in case of an emergency.

Most people I know, carry a map and a compass in their backpack when trekking in the wilderness, why wouldn’t you?  At the same time 9 out of 10 don’t know how to use them correctly. I prefer to use a plain old low-tech compass to a smart phone or a GPS.  My cheap $6 to $10-dollar compass requires no batteries and it relies on the Earth’s magnetic field to help me find directions.  Low-tech, low-cost and low-maintenance.

In this series of articles, we will go over the basics of using the compass and applying that knowledge to navigate unfamiliar terrain with a map.

81HEI-Xhm4L