The Bulletin - Wikipedia
The Bulletin was founded by J. F. Archibald and John Haynes , with the first issue being published in 1880. [2] The original content of The Bulletin consisted of a mix of political comment, sensationalised news, and Australian literature.

The Bulletin was founded by J. F. Archibald and John Haynes , with the first issue being published in 1880. [2] The original content of The Bulletin consisted of a mix of political comment, sensationalised news, and Australian literature. [3]

In the early years, The Bulletin played a significant role in the encouragement and circulation of nationalist sentiments that remained influential far into the next century. Its writers and cartoonists regularly attacked the British, Chinese, Japanese, Indians, Jews, and Aborigines. [4] In 1886, editor James Edmond changed The Bulletin ' s nationalist banner from "Australia for Australians" to "Australia for the White Man". [3] An editorial, published in The Bulletin the following year, laid out its reasons for choosing such banners: [5]

By the term Australian we mean not those who have been merely born in Australia. All white men who come to these shores—with a clean record—and who leave behind them the memory of the class distinctions and the religious differences of the old world ... all men who leave the tyrant-ridden lands of Europe for freedom of speech and right of personal liberty are Australians before they set foot on the ship which brings them hither. Those who ... leave their fatherland because they cannot swallow the worm-eaten lie of the divine right of kings to murder peasants, are Australian by instinct—Australian and Republican are synonymous.

The Bulletin was founded by J. F. Archibald and John Haynes , with the first issue being published in 1880. [2] The original content of The Bulletin consisted of a mix of political comment, sensationalised news, and Australian literature. [3]

In the early years, The Bulletin played a significant role in the encouragement and circulation of nationalist sentiments that remained influential far into the next century. Its writers and cartoonists regularly attacked the British, Chinese, Japanese, Indians, Jews, and Aborigines. [4] In 1886, editor James Edmond changed The Bulletin ' s nationalist banner from "Australia for Australians" to "Australia for the White Man". [3] An editorial, published in The Bulletin the following year, laid out its reasons for choosing such banners: [5]

By the term Australian we mean not those who have been merely born in Australia. All white men who come to these shores—with a clean record—and who leave behind them the memory of the class distinctions and the religious differences of the old world ... all men who leave the tyrant-ridden lands of Europe for freedom of speech and right of personal liberty are Australians before they set foot on the ship which brings them hither. Those who ... leave their fatherland because they cannot swallow the worm-eaten lie of the divine right of kings to murder peasants, are Australian by instinct—Australian and Republican are synonymous.

While the record will show that corn planting progressed at a more or less normal rate this spring in Illinois, wet, cool conditions that developed after nearly half of the crop had been planted resulted in a great deal of replanting, especially in the flat-soil areas of Illinois. Some fields damaged by water and some that were too wet to plant before late May likely were planted to soybeans instead of corn. The June 30 acreage report shows Illinois corn acreage dropping by 500,000 from 2016 to 2017 (to 11.1 million acres) and soybean acreage increasing by 290,000 acres, to 10.4 million acres in 2017.

The Illinois corn crop condition ratings (from NASS) reflect both the poor growing conditions during the first weeks of May and the fact that so much replanting took place. The May 14 rating showed that only 42 percent of the corn crop was in good or excellent condition. This rose to 52 percent by May 28, and to 59 percent by June 4. It has remained around 60 percent for the past month, and was 62 percent on June 25. That’s lower than in any of the previous four years, and is lower than the 70 percent or more that is typical for a corn crop on its way to high yields.

The weather so far in the 2017 growing season will look more or less average in retrospect, but has been more variable than usual. April was relatively warm with average rainfall, and May was wetter to much wetter, and a bit cooler than normal. The first half of June was dry with temperatures 2 to 5 degrees above normal, while during the second half of June, rainfall varied from below to above normal, and temperatures were 2 to 3 degrees below normal. Even though they took a roundabout way to get there, growing degree day (GDD) accumulations were close to normal by the end of June, and corn planted in mid-April in central Illinois had accumulated enough GDD to be at or near silking.

2016 impact factor: 4.939
Ranked 13th out of 176 journals in the field of Public, Occupational and Environmental health.

The venerable CBS newsmagazine interviews the Stanford nuclear weapons expert and  Bulletin  columnist about Pyongyang's nuclear weapons program 

The Bulletin Brief is produced at University of Toronto Communications. It covers news, information and services that are important for staff and faculty across the university to know. 

Please take a look at our past few issues to get a sense of the content published in The Bulletin Brief . We welcome short, timely submissions that: 
- Are aimed at U of T staff and faculty
- Offer low cost or free services, events and professional development opportunities to U of T staff and faculty 
- Tell an interesting story about staff and faculty life at U of T 

Whenever possible, your submission should be of interest to staff and faculty on all three campuses. And please be sure include a link to more information. 

The Bulletin was founded by J. F. Archibald and John Haynes , with the first issue being published in 1880. [2] The original content of The Bulletin consisted of a mix of political comment, sensationalised news, and Australian literature. [3]

In the early years, The Bulletin played a significant role in the encouragement and circulation of nationalist sentiments that remained influential far into the next century. Its writers and cartoonists regularly attacked the British, Chinese, Japanese, Indians, Jews, and Aborigines. [4] In 1886, editor James Edmond changed The Bulletin ' s nationalist banner from "Australia for Australians" to "Australia for the White Man". [3] An editorial, published in The Bulletin the following year, laid out its reasons for choosing such banners: [5]

By the term Australian we mean not those who have been merely born in Australia. All white men who come to these shores—with a clean record—and who leave behind them the memory of the class distinctions and the religious differences of the old world ... all men who leave the tyrant-ridden lands of Europe for freedom of speech and right of personal liberty are Australians before they set foot on the ship which brings them hither. Those who ... leave their fatherland because they cannot swallow the worm-eaten lie of the divine right of kings to murder peasants, are Australian by instinct—Australian and Republican are synonymous.

While the record will show that corn planting progressed at a more or less normal rate this spring in Illinois, wet, cool conditions that developed after nearly half of the crop had been planted resulted in a great deal of replanting, especially in the flat-soil areas of Illinois. Some fields damaged by water and some that were too wet to plant before late May likely were planted to soybeans instead of corn. The June 30 acreage report shows Illinois corn acreage dropping by 500,000 from 2016 to 2017 (to 11.1 million acres) and soybean acreage increasing by 290,000 acres, to 10.4 million acres in 2017.

The Illinois corn crop condition ratings (from NASS) reflect both the poor growing conditions during the first weeks of May and the fact that so much replanting took place. The May 14 rating showed that only 42 percent of the corn crop was in good or excellent condition. This rose to 52 percent by May 28, and to 59 percent by June 4. It has remained around 60 percent for the past month, and was 62 percent on June 25. That’s lower than in any of the previous four years, and is lower than the 70 percent or more that is typical for a corn crop on its way to high yields.

The weather so far in the 2017 growing season will look more or less average in retrospect, but has been more variable than usual. April was relatively warm with average rainfall, and May was wetter to much wetter, and a bit cooler than normal. The first half of June was dry with temperatures 2 to 5 degrees above normal, while during the second half of June, rainfall varied from below to above normal, and temperatures were 2 to 3 degrees below normal. Even though they took a roundabout way to get there, growing degree day (GDD) accumulations were close to normal by the end of June, and corn planted in mid-April in central Illinois had accumulated enough GDD to be at or near silking.

The Bulletin was founded by J. F. Archibald and John Haynes , with the first issue being published in 1880. [2] The original content of The Bulletin consisted of a mix of political comment, sensationalised news, and Australian literature. [3]

In the early years, The Bulletin played a significant role in the encouragement and circulation of nationalist sentiments that remained influential far into the next century. Its writers and cartoonists regularly attacked the British, Chinese, Japanese, Indians, Jews, and Aborigines. [4] In 1886, editor James Edmond changed The Bulletin ' s nationalist banner from "Australia for Australians" to "Australia for the White Man". [3] An editorial, published in The Bulletin the following year, laid out its reasons for choosing such banners: [5]

By the term Australian we mean not those who have been merely born in Australia. All white men who come to these shores—with a clean record—and who leave behind them the memory of the class distinctions and the religious differences of the old world ... all men who leave the tyrant-ridden lands of Europe for freedom of speech and right of personal liberty are Australians before they set foot on the ship which brings them hither. Those who ... leave their fatherland because they cannot swallow the worm-eaten lie of the divine right of kings to murder peasants, are Australian by instinct—Australian and Republican are synonymous.

While the record will show that corn planting progressed at a more or less normal rate this spring in Illinois, wet, cool conditions that developed after nearly half of the crop had been planted resulted in a great deal of replanting, especially in the flat-soil areas of Illinois. Some fields damaged by water and some that were too wet to plant before late May likely were planted to soybeans instead of corn. The June 30 acreage report shows Illinois corn acreage dropping by 500,000 from 2016 to 2017 (to 11.1 million acres) and soybean acreage increasing by 290,000 acres, to 10.4 million acres in 2017.

The Illinois corn crop condition ratings (from NASS) reflect both the poor growing conditions during the first weeks of May and the fact that so much replanting took place. The May 14 rating showed that only 42 percent of the corn crop was in good or excellent condition. This rose to 52 percent by May 28, and to 59 percent by June 4. It has remained around 60 percent for the past month, and was 62 percent on June 25. That’s lower than in any of the previous four years, and is lower than the 70 percent or more that is typical for a corn crop on its way to high yields.

The weather so far in the 2017 growing season will look more or less average in retrospect, but has been more variable than usual. April was relatively warm with average rainfall, and May was wetter to much wetter, and a bit cooler than normal. The first half of June was dry with temperatures 2 to 5 degrees above normal, while during the second half of June, rainfall varied from below to above normal, and temperatures were 2 to 3 degrees below normal. Even though they took a roundabout way to get there, growing degree day (GDD) accumulations were close to normal by the end of June, and corn planted in mid-April in central Illinois had accumulated enough GDD to be at or near silking.

2016 impact factor: 4.939
Ranked 13th out of 176 journals in the field of Public, Occupational and Environmental health.

The Bulletin was founded by J. F. Archibald and John Haynes , with the first issue being published in 1880. [2] The original content of The Bulletin consisted of a mix of political comment, sensationalised news, and Australian literature. [3]

In the early years, The Bulletin played a significant role in the encouragement and circulation of nationalist sentiments that remained influential far into the next century. Its writers and cartoonists regularly attacked the British, Chinese, Japanese, Indians, Jews, and Aborigines. [4] In 1886, editor James Edmond changed The Bulletin ' s nationalist banner from "Australia for Australians" to "Australia for the White Man". [3] An editorial, published in The Bulletin the following year, laid out its reasons for choosing such banners: [5]

By the term Australian we mean not those who have been merely born in Australia. All white men who come to these shores—with a clean record—and who leave behind them the memory of the class distinctions and the religious differences of the old world ... all men who leave the tyrant-ridden lands of Europe for freedom of speech and right of personal liberty are Australians before they set foot on the ship which brings them hither. Those who ... leave their fatherland because they cannot swallow the worm-eaten lie of the divine right of kings to murder peasants, are Australian by instinct—Australian and Republican are synonymous.

While the record will show that corn planting progressed at a more or less normal rate this spring in Illinois, wet, cool conditions that developed after nearly half of the crop had been planted resulted in a great deal of replanting, especially in the flat-soil areas of Illinois. Some fields damaged by water and some that were too wet to plant before late May likely were planted to soybeans instead of corn. The June 30 acreage report shows Illinois corn acreage dropping by 500,000 from 2016 to 2017 (to 11.1 million acres) and soybean acreage increasing by 290,000 acres, to 10.4 million acres in 2017.

The Illinois corn crop condition ratings (from NASS) reflect both the poor growing conditions during the first weeks of May and the fact that so much replanting took place. The May 14 rating showed that only 42 percent of the corn crop was in good or excellent condition. This rose to 52 percent by May 28, and to 59 percent by June 4. It has remained around 60 percent for the past month, and was 62 percent on June 25. That’s lower than in any of the previous four years, and is lower than the 70 percent or more that is typical for a corn crop on its way to high yields.

The weather so far in the 2017 growing season will look more or less average in retrospect, but has been more variable than usual. April was relatively warm with average rainfall, and May was wetter to much wetter, and a bit cooler than normal. The first half of June was dry with temperatures 2 to 5 degrees above normal, while during the second half of June, rainfall varied from below to above normal, and temperatures were 2 to 3 degrees below normal. Even though they took a roundabout way to get there, growing degree day (GDD) accumulations were close to normal by the end of June, and corn planted in mid-April in central Illinois had accumulated enough GDD to be at or near silking.

2016 impact factor: 4.939
Ranked 13th out of 176 journals in the field of Public, Occupational and Environmental health.

The venerable CBS newsmagazine interviews the Stanford nuclear weapons expert and  Bulletin  columnist about Pyongyang's nuclear weapons program 

The Bulletin of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland, Vol. 10: October 1917-May 1918 (Classic Reprint)


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