The Surgeon s Log : Being Impressions of the Far East by.
Back in April, the Journal of Rural Medicine published an article that spelled out some of the ways in which rural medicine is a tough gig: Rural primary care physicians “tend to work longer hours, complete more patient visits, and have a much greater

Back in April, the Journal of Rural Medicine published an article that spelled out some of the ways in which rural medicine is a tough gig: Rural primary care physicians “tend to work longer hours, complete more patient visits, and have a much greater proportion of Medicaid patients” than urban physicians. Worse still, “[a]fter adjusting for work effort, physician characteristics, and practice characteristics, primary care physicians who practice in rural settings made $9,585 (5%) less than their urban counterparts."

So being a doctor in a rural region means less pay, longer hours (anywhere from 4 to 10 percent longer per week than urban doctors), and more Medicaid patients—none of which is particularly appealing to doctors.  (As I noted last year, reimbursement rates for Medicaid are abysmally low across the nation). At this point you may be thinking that this sounds like a warning to anyone even thinking about becoming a rural doctor.

Not so fast. According to the Center for Studying Health System Change , the notion that the average rural doctor earns less is, well, what you might call an urban myth. While the Journal of Rural Medicine (JRM) looked only at primary care physicians and concluded that they make 5 percent less than their urban counterparts, CSHSC’s study of all physicians in rural practice tells a slightly different story.

The Surgeon General of the United States is the operational head of the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (PHSCC) and thus the leading spokesperson on matters of public health in the federal government of the United States . The Surgeon General's office and staff are known as the Office of the Surgeon General ( OSG ).

The Surgeon General reports to the Assistant Secretary for Health (ASH), who may be a four-star admiral in the commissioned corps , and who serves as the principal adviser to the Secretary of Health and Human Services on public health and scientific issues. The Surgeon General is the overall head of the Commissioned Corps, a 6,500-member cadre of uniformed health professionals who are on call 24 hours a day, and can be dispatched by the Secretary of HHS or the Assistant Secretary for Health in the event of a public health emergency.

The Surgeon General is also the ultimate award authority for several public health awards and decorations, the highest of which that can be directly awarded is the Surgeon General's Medallion (the highest award bestowed by board action is the Public Health Service Distinguished Service Medal ). The Surgeon General also has many informal duties, such as educating the American public about health issues and advocating healthy lifestyle choices.

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Back in April, the Journal of Rural Medicine published an article that spelled out some of the ways in which rural medicine is a tough gig: Rural primary care physicians “tend to work longer hours, complete more patient visits, and have a much greater proportion of Medicaid patients” than urban physicians. Worse still, “[a]fter adjusting for work effort, physician characteristics, and practice characteristics, primary care physicians who practice in rural settings made $9,585 (5%) less than their urban counterparts."

So being a doctor in a rural region means less pay, longer hours (anywhere from 4 to 10 percent longer per week than urban doctors), and more Medicaid patients—none of which is particularly appealing to doctors.  (As I noted last year, reimbursement rates for Medicaid are abysmally low across the nation). At this point you may be thinking that this sounds like a warning to anyone even thinking about becoming a rural doctor.

Not so fast. According to the Center for Studying Health System Change , the notion that the average rural doctor earns less is, well, what you might call an urban myth. While the Journal of Rural Medicine (JRM) looked only at primary care physicians and concluded that they make 5 percent less than their urban counterparts, CSHSC’s study of all physicians in rural practice tells a slightly different story.

Back in April, the Journal of Rural Medicine published an article that spelled out some of the ways in which rural medicine is a tough gig: Rural primary care physicians “tend to work longer hours, complete more patient visits, and have a much greater proportion of Medicaid patients” than urban physicians. Worse still, “[a]fter adjusting for work effort, physician characteristics, and practice characteristics, primary care physicians who practice in rural settings made $9,585 (5%) less than their urban counterparts."

So being a doctor in a rural region means less pay, longer hours (anywhere from 4 to 10 percent longer per week than urban doctors), and more Medicaid patients—none of which is particularly appealing to doctors.  (As I noted last year, reimbursement rates for Medicaid are abysmally low across the nation). At this point you may be thinking that this sounds like a warning to anyone even thinking about becoming a rural doctor.

Not so fast. According to the Center for Studying Health System Change , the notion that the average rural doctor earns less is, well, what you might call an urban myth. While the Journal of Rural Medicine (JRM) looked only at primary care physicians and concluded that they make 5 percent less than their urban counterparts, CSHSC’s study of all physicians in rural practice tells a slightly different story.

The Surgeon General of the United States is the operational head of the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (PHSCC) and thus the leading spokesperson on matters of public health in the federal government of the United States . The Surgeon General's office and staff are known as the Office of the Surgeon General ( OSG ).

The Surgeon General reports to the Assistant Secretary for Health (ASH), who may be a four-star admiral in the commissioned corps , and who serves as the principal adviser to the Secretary of Health and Human Services on public health and scientific issues. The Surgeon General is the overall head of the Commissioned Corps, a 6,500-member cadre of uniformed health professionals who are on call 24 hours a day, and can be dispatched by the Secretary of HHS or the Assistant Secretary for Health in the event of a public health emergency.

The Surgeon General is also the ultimate award authority for several public health awards and decorations, the highest of which that can be directly awarded is the Surgeon General's Medallion (the highest award bestowed by board action is the Public Health Service Distinguished Service Medal ). The Surgeon General also has many informal duties, such as educating the American public about health issues and advocating healthy lifestyle choices.

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