Sophy of Kravonia; or, The Virgin of Paris (1920) - IMDb
Sir Anthony Hope Hawkins , better known as Anthony Hope (9 February 1863 – 8 July 1933), was an English novelist and playwright. [1] He was a prolific writer, especially of adventure novels but he is remembered predominantly for only two books: The

Sir Anthony Hope Hawkins , better known as Anthony Hope (9 February 1863 – 8 July 1933), was an English novelist and playwright. [1] He was a prolific writer, especially of adventure novels but he is remembered predominantly for only two books: The Prisoner of Zenda (1894) and its sequel Rupert of Hentzau (1898). These works, "minor classics" of English literature , are set in the contemporaneous fictional country of Ruritania and spawned the genre known as Ruritanian romance , works set in fictional European locales similar to the novels. [2] Zenda has inspired many adaptations , most notably the 1937 Hollywood movie of the same name.

Hope was educated at St John's School, Leatherhead , Marlborough College and Balliol College, Oxford . [3] Hope trained as a lawyer and barrister, being called to the Bar by the Middle Temple in 1887. He served his pupillage under the future Liberal Prime Minister H H Asquith , who thought him a promising barrister and who was disappointed by his decision to turn to writing. [4]

Hope wrote 32 volumes of fiction over the course of his lifetime and he had a large popular following. In 1896 he published The Chronicles of Count Antonio , followed in 1897 by a tale of adventure set on a Greek island, entitled Phroso . [5] He went on a publicity tour of the United States in late 1897, during which he impressed a New York Times reporter as being somewhat like Rudolf Rassendyll: a well-dressed Englishman with a hearty laugh, a soldierly attitude, a dry sense of humour, "quiet, easy manners," and an air of shrewdness. [10]

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