California Department of Fish and Wildlife - Wikipedia
The primary responsibility for enforcing fish and wildlife-related statutes and regulations in Alaska lies with the Alaska Department of Public Safety, through its Division of Alaska Wildlife Troopers . Biologists and other staff of the Alaska

The primary responsibility for enforcing fish and wildlife-related statutes and regulations in Alaska lies with the Alaska Department of Public Safety, through its Division of Alaska Wildlife Troopers . Biologists and other staff of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) sometimes participate in enforcement activities and assist the Wildlife Troopers as needed; however, law enforcement is not a primary function of ADF&G.

Through education, presence, and enforcement actions, the Alaska Wildlife Troopers are committed to reducing boating-related deaths and injuries, and conducting the following types of fisheries, wildlife, and habitat protection actions across the state:

The division also enforces other types of regulations passed by the Board of Game and the Board of Fisheries. This includes those designed to protect Alaska’s native species from harmful invasive species, prevent importation of exotic pets , and prevent illegal export of animal parts from Alaska.

During the early history of the United States , little or no attention was paid to the destruction of birds or other wild animals. Probably the earliest law on the subject was one passed in Massachusetts in 1817, establishing closed seasons for certain animals and birds shot as game. [4] Eventually wild game, whether of forest, field or stream, became perhaps better protected than in any other country in the world. All states passed game laws of their own. Nearly every state instituted a game and fish commission and numerous game wardens. [3]

A national game law, known as the Lacey Act , passed by the U.S. Congress in 1900, gave to the United States Department of Agriculture certain powers, by which, among other provisions, no importation of wild animals, birds or fishes could be made without a permit from Secretary of Agriculture. Many important additions and amendments to the Federal laws were passed during the succeeding 10 years, all tending to protect game and game birds in their natural state without interfering with the importation of birds, birds' eggs or animals for breeding purposes. During 1910 there was an increase in these importations. [3]

Congress then came to adopt the theory that the migratory birds, being in most cases mere travelers across states, were not local residents nor state property, but belonged to the people at large; and if they were to be saved to the people the national authority must intervene. Therefore, Congress passed (4 March 1913) the Weeks–McLean Act , the gist of which was: [4]

The State Organization Index provides an alphabetical listing of government organizations, including commissions, departments, and bureaus.

The State Organization Index provides an alphabetical listing of government organizations, including commissions, departments, and bureaus.

Through the effective management of wildlife and habitat, MassWildlife ensures quality outdoor recreational opportunities for hunters, anglers, and outdoor enthusiasts who enjoy the impressive variety of plants, fish, and wildlife found in Massachusetts. Outdoor skills clinics, wildlife education workshops, presentations, and online resources provide all residents with a greater understanding and appreciation for wildlife conservation. Keep in touch with us  – sign up to receive monthly e-newsletters .


Every state has a fish and game department (DFG) charged with the protection of habitat and the management and protection of fish, wildlife and plants within its boundaries.  The department is also responsible for public education, law enforcement and limiting invasive species (like Quagga and Zebra mussels).  The DFG uses a variety of ways to manage the state’s resources; one of which being the law enforcement division.  The most visible part of the division to the public, DFG officers help protect wildlife from poachers and polluters, enforce laws, issue citations, and provide public safety.

As anglers, we need to know the state regulations to avoid costly penalties associated with violations.  Laws vary from state to state, so it’s important for sportsmen to learn the local laws before heading into the outdoors; this information can be obtained from your state’s DFG website.

Since I live in CA this article will focus on the laws in my home state.  With assistance from various California DFG employees, the DFG Public Information Officer, and researching the DFG web site ( http://www.dfg.ca.gov/ ), I was able to compile some important information regarding laws pertaining to bass anglers, the agencies that enforce those laws and how the money from fines is distributed.

Uploaded by julielefevre on September 25, 2007

The primary responsibility for enforcing fish and wildlife-related statutes and regulations in Alaska lies with the Alaska Department of Public Safety, through its Division of Alaska Wildlife Troopers . Biologists and other staff of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) sometimes participate in enforcement activities and assist the Wildlife Troopers as needed; however, law enforcement is not a primary function of ADF&G.

Through education, presence, and enforcement actions, the Alaska Wildlife Troopers are committed to reducing boating-related deaths and injuries, and conducting the following types of fisheries, wildlife, and habitat protection actions across the state:

The division also enforces other types of regulations passed by the Board of Game and the Board of Fisheries. This includes those designed to protect Alaska’s native species from harmful invasive species, prevent importation of exotic pets , and prevent illegal export of animal parts from Alaska.

During the early history of the United States , little or no attention was paid to the destruction of birds or other wild animals. Probably the earliest law on the subject was one passed in Massachusetts in 1817, establishing closed seasons for certain animals and birds shot as game. [4] Eventually wild game, whether of forest, field or stream, became perhaps better protected than in any other country in the world. All states passed game laws of their own. Nearly every state instituted a game and fish commission and numerous game wardens. [3]

A national game law, known as the Lacey Act , passed by the U.S. Congress in 1900, gave to the United States Department of Agriculture certain powers, by which, among other provisions, no importation of wild animals, birds or fishes could be made without a permit from Secretary of Agriculture. Many important additions and amendments to the Federal laws were passed during the succeeding 10 years, all tending to protect game and game birds in their natural state without interfering with the importation of birds, birds' eggs or animals for breeding purposes. During 1910 there was an increase in these importations. [3]

Congress then came to adopt the theory that the migratory birds, being in most cases mere travelers across states, were not local residents nor state property, but belonged to the people at large; and if they were to be saved to the people the national authority must intervene. Therefore, Congress passed (4 March 1913) the Weeks–McLean Act , the gist of which was: [4]

The State Organization Index provides an alphabetical listing of government organizations, including commissions, departments, and bureaus.

The State Organization Index provides an alphabetical listing of government organizations, including commissions, departments, and bureaus.

Through the effective management of wildlife and habitat, MassWildlife ensures quality outdoor recreational opportunities for hunters, anglers, and outdoor enthusiasts who enjoy the impressive variety of plants, fish, and wildlife found in Massachusetts. Outdoor skills clinics, wildlife education workshops, presentations, and online resources provide all residents with a greater understanding and appreciation for wildlife conservation. Keep in touch with us  – sign up to receive monthly e-newsletters .

The primary responsibility for enforcing fish and wildlife-related statutes and regulations in Alaska lies with the Alaska Department of Public Safety, through its Division of Alaska Wildlife Troopers . Biologists and other staff of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) sometimes participate in enforcement activities and assist the Wildlife Troopers as needed; however, law enforcement is not a primary function of ADF&G.

Through education, presence, and enforcement actions, the Alaska Wildlife Troopers are committed to reducing boating-related deaths and injuries, and conducting the following types of fisheries, wildlife, and habitat protection actions across the state:

The division also enforces other types of regulations passed by the Board of Game and the Board of Fisheries. This includes those designed to protect Alaska’s native species from harmful invasive species, prevent importation of exotic pets , and prevent illegal export of animal parts from Alaska.

The primary responsibility for enforcing fish and wildlife-related statutes and regulations in Alaska lies with the Alaska Department of Public Safety, through its Division of Alaska Wildlife Troopers . Biologists and other staff of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) sometimes participate in enforcement activities and assist the Wildlife Troopers as needed; however, law enforcement is not a primary function of ADF&G.

Through education, presence, and enforcement actions, the Alaska Wildlife Troopers are committed to reducing boating-related deaths and injuries, and conducting the following types of fisheries, wildlife, and habitat protection actions across the state:

The division also enforces other types of regulations passed by the Board of Game and the Board of Fisheries. This includes those designed to protect Alaska’s native species from harmful invasive species, prevent importation of exotic pets , and prevent illegal export of animal parts from Alaska.

During the early history of the United States , little or no attention was paid to the destruction of birds or other wild animals. Probably the earliest law on the subject was one passed in Massachusetts in 1817, establishing closed seasons for certain animals and birds shot as game. [4] Eventually wild game, whether of forest, field or stream, became perhaps better protected than in any other country in the world. All states passed game laws of their own. Nearly every state instituted a game and fish commission and numerous game wardens. [3]

A national game law, known as the Lacey Act , passed by the U.S. Congress in 1900, gave to the United States Department of Agriculture certain powers, by which, among other provisions, no importation of wild animals, birds or fishes could be made without a permit from Secretary of Agriculture. Many important additions and amendments to the Federal laws were passed during the succeeding 10 years, all tending to protect game and game birds in their natural state without interfering with the importation of birds, birds' eggs or animals for breeding purposes. During 1910 there was an increase in these importations. [3]

Congress then came to adopt the theory that the migratory birds, being in most cases mere travelers across states, were not local residents nor state property, but belonged to the people at large; and if they were to be saved to the people the national authority must intervene. Therefore, Congress passed (4 March 1913) the Weeks–McLean Act , the gist of which was: [4]

The State Organization Index provides an alphabetical listing of government organizations, including commissions, departments, and bureaus.

The State Organization Index provides an alphabetical listing of government organizations, including commissions, departments, and bureaus.

Through the effective management of wildlife and habitat, MassWildlife ensures quality outdoor recreational opportunities for hunters, anglers, and outdoor enthusiasts who enjoy the impressive variety of plants, fish, and wildlife found in Massachusetts. Outdoor skills clinics, wildlife education workshops, presentations, and online resources provide all residents with a greater understanding and appreciation for wildlife conservation. Keep in touch with us  – sign up to receive monthly e-newsletters .


Every state has a fish and game department (DFG) charged with the protection of habitat and the management and protection of fish, wildlife and plants within its boundaries.  The department is also responsible for public education, law enforcement and limiting invasive species (like Quagga and Zebra mussels).  The DFG uses a variety of ways to manage the state’s resources; one of which being the law enforcement division.  The most visible part of the division to the public, DFG officers help protect wildlife from poachers and polluters, enforce laws, issue citations, and provide public safety.

As anglers, we need to know the state regulations to avoid costly penalties associated with violations.  Laws vary from state to state, so it’s important for sportsmen to learn the local laws before heading into the outdoors; this information can be obtained from your state’s DFG website.

Since I live in CA this article will focus on the laws in my home state.  With assistance from various California DFG employees, the DFG Public Information Officer, and researching the DFG web site ( http://www.dfg.ca.gov/ ), I was able to compile some important information regarding laws pertaining to bass anglers, the agencies that enforce those laws and how the money from fines is distributed.

The primary responsibility for enforcing fish and wildlife-related statutes and regulations in Alaska lies with the Alaska Department of Public Safety, through its Division of Alaska Wildlife Troopers . Biologists and other staff of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) sometimes participate in enforcement activities and assist the Wildlife Troopers as needed; however, law enforcement is not a primary function of ADF&G.

Through education, presence, and enforcement actions, the Alaska Wildlife Troopers are committed to reducing boating-related deaths and injuries, and conducting the following types of fisheries, wildlife, and habitat protection actions across the state:

The division also enforces other types of regulations passed by the Board of Game and the Board of Fisheries. This includes those designed to protect Alaska’s native species from harmful invasive species, prevent importation of exotic pets , and prevent illegal export of animal parts from Alaska.

During the early history of the United States , little or no attention was paid to the destruction of birds or other wild animals. Probably the earliest law on the subject was one passed in Massachusetts in 1817, establishing closed seasons for certain animals and birds shot as game. [4] Eventually wild game, whether of forest, field or stream, became perhaps better protected than in any other country in the world. All states passed game laws of their own. Nearly every state instituted a game and fish commission and numerous game wardens. [3]

A national game law, known as the Lacey Act , passed by the U.S. Congress in 1900, gave to the United States Department of Agriculture certain powers, by which, among other provisions, no importation of wild animals, birds or fishes could be made without a permit from Secretary of Agriculture. Many important additions and amendments to the Federal laws were passed during the succeeding 10 years, all tending to protect game and game birds in their natural state without interfering with the importation of birds, birds' eggs or animals for breeding purposes. During 1910 there was an increase in these importations. [3]

Congress then came to adopt the theory that the migratory birds, being in most cases mere travelers across states, were not local residents nor state property, but belonged to the people at large; and if they were to be saved to the people the national authority must intervene. Therefore, Congress passed (4 March 1913) the Weeks–McLean Act , the gist of which was: [4]

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