Amazon.com: Brilliance of the Moon: Tales of the Otori.
Its over ten years since the publication of the first book Across the Nightingale Floor (2002). Since then the Tales of the Otori have been world wide best sellers appealing to millions of readers in over 36 countries.Film rights were sold before the

It's over ten years since the publication of the first book Across the Nightingale Floor (2002). Since then the Tales of the Otori have been world wide best sellers appealing to millions of readers in over 36 countries.

Film rights were sold before the first book was published to Universal Studios for Kennedy/Marshall, and David Henry Hwang was assigned as script writer. As yet the film has not been developed beyond the scripting stage.

The title comes from a Noh play by Zeami, The Fulling Block, which is the play Kaede watches with Lord Fujiwara in Grass For His Pillow. Like Grass For His Pillow the title contains five syllables. Across the Nightingale Floor has seven. Last year an aquaintance, Professor Shimizu, observed to me, 'The classic Japanese rhythm is in five syllables and seven syllables.' Of course, this is the rhythm of the haiku go shichi go . It made me go back and look at my titles and texts and I realised how often I used this rhythm unconsciously. Many people have commented on how "Japanese" the language in Tales of the Otori sounds, and this may be one of the reasons.

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Takeo and the exquisite Kaede, still only teenagers, are now married, but the implacable forces of destiny that rule their lives tear them apart. Takeo, a battle-hardened warrior at the head of an army fighting for his Otori birthright, finds his courage and leadership forged in the fire of bloodshed and sacrifice, while his legendary magical powers are tested to their limits against the invisible assassins of the Tribe. Kaede, determined to reclaim her own lands, is treacherously betrayed and forced into marriage. Their love will survive until death - but death, in this savage, beautiful world, is always only a moment away.

A beautiful, haunting evocation of the medieval Japan of Lian Hearn's imagination, this thrilling follow-up to Grass for His Pillow and Across the Nightingale Floor delves deeper into the complex loyalties that bind its characters from birth. Filled with adventure and surprising twists of plot and fortune, this final volume travels beyond the Three Countries, to the outsid

A beautiful, haunting evocation of the medieval Japan of Lian Hearn's imagination, this thrilling follow-up to Grass for His Pillow and Across the Nightingale Floor delves deeper into the complex loyalties that bind its characters from birth. Filled with adventure and surprising twists of plot and fortune, this final volume travels beyond the Three Countries, to the outside influences that threaten to intrude upon this isolated realm.

It's over ten years since the publication of the first book Across the Nightingale Floor (2002). Since then the Tales of the Otori have been world wide best sellers appealing to millions of readers in over 36 countries.

Film rights were sold before the first book was published to Universal Studios for Kennedy/Marshall, and David Henry Hwang was assigned as script writer. As yet the film has not been developed beyond the scripting stage.

The title comes from a Noh play by Zeami, The Fulling Block, which is the play Kaede watches with Lord Fujiwara in Grass For His Pillow. Like Grass For His Pillow the title contains five syllables. Across the Nightingale Floor has seven. Last year an aquaintance, Professor Shimizu, observed to me, 'The classic Japanese rhythm is in five syllables and seven syllables.' Of course, this is the rhythm of the haiku go shichi go . It made me go back and look at my titles and texts and I realised how often I used this rhythm unconsciously. Many people have commented on how "Japanese" the language in Tales of the Otori sounds, and this may be one of the reasons.

It's over ten years since the publication of the first book Across the Nightingale Floor (2002). Since then the Tales of the Otori have been world wide best sellers appealing to millions of readers in over 36 countries.

Film rights were sold before the first book was published to Universal Studios for Kennedy/Marshall, and David Henry Hwang was assigned as script writer. As yet the film has not been developed beyond the scripting stage.

The title comes from a Noh play by Zeami, The Fulling Block, which is the play Kaede watches with Lord Fujiwara in Grass For His Pillow. Like Grass For His Pillow the title contains five syllables. Across the Nightingale Floor has seven. Last year an aquaintance, Professor Shimizu, observed to me, 'The classic Japanese rhythm is in five syllables and seven syllables.' Of course, this is the rhythm of the haiku go shichi go . It made me go back and look at my titles and texts and I realised how often I used this rhythm unconsciously. Many people have commented on how "Japanese" the language in Tales of the Otori sounds, and this may be one of the reasons.

With an OverDrive account, you can save your favorite libraries for at-a-glance information about availability. Find out more about OverDrive accounts.

Takeo and the exquisite Kaede, still only teenagers, are now married, but the implacable forces of destiny that rule their lives tear them apart. Takeo, a battle-hardened warrior at the head of an army fighting for his Otori birthright, finds his courage and leadership forged in the fire of bloodshed and sacrifice, while his legendary magical powers are tested to their limits against the invisible assassins of the Tribe. Kaede, determined to reclaim her own lands, is treacherously betrayed and forced into marriage. Their love will survive until death - but death, in this savage, beautiful world, is always only a moment away.

It's over ten years since the publication of the first book Across the Nightingale Floor (2002). Since then the Tales of the Otori have been world wide best sellers appealing to millions of readers in over 36 countries.

Film rights were sold before the first book was published to Universal Studios for Kennedy/Marshall, and David Henry Hwang was assigned as script writer. As yet the film has not been developed beyond the scripting stage.

The title comes from a Noh play by Zeami, The Fulling Block, which is the play Kaede watches with Lord Fujiwara in Grass For His Pillow. Like Grass For His Pillow the title contains five syllables. Across the Nightingale Floor has seven. Last year an aquaintance, Professor Shimizu, observed to me, 'The classic Japanese rhythm is in five syllables and seven syllables.' Of course, this is the rhythm of the haiku go shichi go . It made me go back and look at my titles and texts and I realised how often I used this rhythm unconsciously. Many people have commented on how "Japanese" the language in Tales of the Otori sounds, and this may be one of the reasons.

With an OverDrive account, you can save your favorite libraries for at-a-glance information about availability. Find out more about OverDrive accounts.

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