Top 20 books about punk rock | Louder Than War
You're currently on {{currently_on}}. However, it looks like you listened to {{listened_to}} on {{device_name}} {{time}}.There has been a whole library of books written about punk rock. It’s a long way from amphetamine guitars and wild

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There has been a whole library of books written about punk rock. It’s a long way from amphetamine guitars and wild nights. I guess it’s the ageing process as a generation of snotty, glue sniffing tearaways got bored of drinking cider, pissing in bus shelters and arguing about what is real punk and started to read about it in weighty tomes. Some of us even get to write them, which means that my ‘Oral History of Punk Rock’ cannot feature in this list because, well that would be a bit stupid wouldn’t it….

The oral history of the New York scene from the mid seventies onwards is documented here in a classic fascinating and seamy ride through the intertwined histories of the Ramones, New York Dolls, CBGBs, Blondie and a whole cast of characters whose lifestyles seem so much more darker and rock n roll than the beautiful naivety of the British scene documented in my own oral history. The American bands now seem closer to the Rolling Stones than punk rock but that makes for a fascinating read and the sordid tales are a great backdrop to the moments of pure inspiration that the New York scene was providing at the time.

There have been endless books on the Clash that has cemented their long standing reputation as the key band of the period, some like Pat Gilbert’s ‘Passion Is A Fashion’ are great reads that tell the story in absorbing detail but somehow it’s Johnny Green’s memoirs of his days as the band’s tour manager that stand out. The book is a funny and poignant take of life on the road with the band at their late seventies peak that captures the last gang in town mentality of classic rock n roll.

Punk rock (or " punk ") is a rock music genre that developed in the mid-1970s in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia. Rooted in 1960s garage rock and other ...

Please Kill Me and other books & projects by Legs McNeil and Gillian McCain. Music, art, culture, fashion, poetry and movies - from the 60s through today.

Top 20 books about punk rock . There has been a whole library of books written about punk rock . It’s a long way from amphetamine guitars and wild nights.

Women of Rock Oral History Project is an oral history project based at Smith College focusing on American women and gender non-conforming , LGBT , and feminist rock and roll and punk music musicians from the 1970s to the present. [1] [2] [3]

The Women of Rock Oral History project was started in December 2014 as a collection of digital video interviews conducted by Smith College Ada Comstock scholar and archivist, Tanya Pearson. [4]

The project includes written transcripts and is housed at the Sophia Smith Collection at Smith College . [7] [8] The scope of the project is to document the influence and history of women in rock and roll, and to bring focus to the unheralded role of women musicians. [9]

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There has been a whole library of books written about punk rock. It’s a long way from amphetamine guitars and wild nights. I guess it’s the ageing process as a generation of snotty, glue sniffing tearaways got bored of drinking cider, pissing in bus shelters and arguing about what is real punk and started to read about it in weighty tomes. Some of us even get to write them, which means that my ‘Oral History of Punk Rock’ cannot feature in this list because, well that would be a bit stupid wouldn’t it….

The oral history of the New York scene from the mid seventies onwards is documented here in a classic fascinating and seamy ride through the intertwined histories of the Ramones, New York Dolls, CBGBs, Blondie and a whole cast of characters whose lifestyles seem so much more darker and rock n roll than the beautiful naivety of the British scene documented in my own oral history. The American bands now seem closer to the Rolling Stones than punk rock but that makes for a fascinating read and the sordid tales are a great backdrop to the moments of pure inspiration that the New York scene was providing at the time.

There have been endless books on the Clash that has cemented their long standing reputation as the key band of the period, some like Pat Gilbert’s ‘Passion Is A Fashion’ are great reads that tell the story in absorbing detail but somehow it’s Johnny Green’s memoirs of his days as the band’s tour manager that stand out. The book is a funny and poignant take of life on the road with the band at their late seventies peak that captures the last gang in town mentality of classic rock n roll.

Punk rock (or " punk ") is a rock music genre that developed in the mid-1970s in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia. Rooted in 1960s garage rock and other ...

Please Kill Me and other books & projects by Legs McNeil and Gillian McCain. Music, art, culture, fashion, poetry and movies - from the 60s through today.

Top 20 books about punk rock . There has been a whole library of books written about punk rock . It’s a long way from amphetamine guitars and wild nights.

You're currently on {{currently_on}}. However, it looks like you listened to {{listened_to}} on {{device_name}} {{time}}.

There has been a whole library of books written about punk rock. It’s a long way from amphetamine guitars and wild nights. I guess it’s the ageing process as a generation of snotty, glue sniffing tearaways got bored of drinking cider, pissing in bus shelters and arguing about what is real punk and started to read about it in weighty tomes. Some of us even get to write them, which means that my ‘Oral History of Punk Rock’ cannot feature in this list because, well that would be a bit stupid wouldn’t it….

The oral history of the New York scene from the mid seventies onwards is documented here in a classic fascinating and seamy ride through the intertwined histories of the Ramones, New York Dolls, CBGBs, Blondie and a whole cast of characters whose lifestyles seem so much more darker and rock n roll than the beautiful naivety of the British scene documented in my own oral history. The American bands now seem closer to the Rolling Stones than punk rock but that makes for a fascinating read and the sordid tales are a great backdrop to the moments of pure inspiration that the New York scene was providing at the time.

There have been endless books on the Clash that has cemented their long standing reputation as the key band of the period, some like Pat Gilbert’s ‘Passion Is A Fashion’ are great reads that tell the story in absorbing detail but somehow it’s Johnny Green’s memoirs of his days as the band’s tour manager that stand out. The book is a funny and poignant take of life on the road with the band at their late seventies peak that captures the last gang in town mentality of classic rock n roll.

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