SparkNotes: Metamorphoses: Book XIII
From: Syllecta Classica Volume 9 (1998) pp. 95-102 | 10.1353/syl.1998.0003If you would like to authenticate using a different subscribed institution that supports Shibboleth authentication or have your own login and

From: Syllecta Classica
Volume 9 (1998)
pp. 95-102 | 10.1353/syl.1998.0003

If you would like to authenticate using a different subscribed institution that supports Shibboleth authentication or have your own login and password to Project MUSE, click 'Authenticate'.

Project MUSE | 2715 North Charles Street | Baltimore, Maryland USA 21218 | (410) 516-6989 | About | Contact | Help | Tools | Order | Accessibility

What would it feel like to live as a believer in the stories Ovid tells? If you worshipped the gods he describes, what would your view of the world be? Would it be better or worse than living under the divine system described by Hesiod?

"Oh, God", he thought, "what a strenuous career it is that I've chosen! Travelling day in and day out. Doing business like this takes much more effort than doing your own business at home, and on top...

In Ovid's Metamorphoses some people are transformed as a reward for good actions, others as punishment for bad actions. How can transformation serve as both a punishment and a reward?

The role of women in the myths seems particularly important to Ovid, and this aspect of his work, his interest in the female element, is reflected elsewhere in his poetry, and strongly influenced European culture. Dante, and Shakespeare, in particular, echo sentiments and imagery in the Metamorphoses .

The Metamorphoses are an ideal resource for those wishing to enter the world of the Greek myths, as well as the refined atmosphere of Augustan Rome. Ovid was aware of the scale and beauty of his achievement, and himself ended the work with a promise of his own literary immortality.

Involved on the fringes of power and politics, it seems that Ovid saw but was not directly implicated in some event that antagonised the Emperor. Ovid was banished in 8AD, to Tomis (now Constanta, in Romania) on the Black Sea coast. In his letters from exile he claims his punishment was for a poem, probably the Art of Love, and an error. The details of the error remain unknown.

From: Syllecta Classica
Volume 9 (1998)
pp. 95-102 | 10.1353/syl.1998.0003

If you would like to authenticate using a different subscribed institution that supports Shibboleth authentication or have your own login and password to Project MUSE, click 'Authenticate'.

Project MUSE | 2715 North Charles Street | Baltimore, Maryland USA 21218 | (410) 516-6989 | About | Contact | Help | Tools | Order | Accessibility

What would it feel like to live as a believer in the stories Ovid tells? If you worshipped the gods he describes, what would your view of the world be? Would it be better or worse than living under the divine system described by Hesiod?

"Oh, God", he thought, "what a strenuous career it is that I've chosen! Travelling day in and day out. Doing business like this takes much more effort than doing your own business at home, and on top...

In Ovid's Metamorphoses some people are transformed as a reward for good actions, others as punishment for bad actions. How can transformation serve as both a punishment and a reward?

From: Syllecta Classica
Volume 9 (1998)
pp. 95-102 | 10.1353/syl.1998.0003

If you would like to authenticate using a different subscribed institution that supports Shibboleth authentication or have your own login and password to Project MUSE, click 'Authenticate'.

Project MUSE | 2715 North Charles Street | Baltimore, Maryland USA 21218 | (410) 516-6989 | About | Contact | Help | Tools | Order | Accessibility

From: Syllecta Classica
Volume 9 (1998)
pp. 95-102 | 10.1353/syl.1998.0003

If you would like to authenticate using a different subscribed institution that supports Shibboleth authentication or have your own login and password to Project MUSE, click 'Authenticate'.

Project MUSE | 2715 North Charles Street | Baltimore, Maryland USA 21218 | (410) 516-6989 | About | Contact | Help | Tools | Order | Accessibility

What would it feel like to live as a believer in the stories Ovid tells? If you worshipped the gods he describes, what would your view of the world be? Would it be better or worse than living under the divine system described by Hesiod?

"Oh, God", he thought, "what a strenuous career it is that I've chosen! Travelling day in and day out. Doing business like this takes much more effort than doing your own business at home, and on top...

In Ovid's Metamorphoses some people are transformed as a reward for good actions, others as punishment for bad actions. How can transformation serve as both a punishment and a reward?

The role of women in the myths seems particularly important to Ovid, and this aspect of his work, his interest in the female element, is reflected elsewhere in his poetry, and strongly influenced European culture. Dante, and Shakespeare, in particular, echo sentiments and imagery in the Metamorphoses .

The Metamorphoses are an ideal resource for those wishing to enter the world of the Greek myths, as well as the refined atmosphere of Augustan Rome. Ovid was aware of the scale and beauty of his achievement, and himself ended the work with a promise of his own literary immortality.

Involved on the fringes of power and politics, it seems that Ovid saw but was not directly implicated in some event that antagonised the Emperor. Ovid was banished in 8AD, to Tomis (now Constanta, in Romania) on the Black Sea coast. In his letters from exile he claims his punishment was for a poem, probably the Art of Love, and an error. The details of the error remain unknown.

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[Honre'] does succeed, though, in conveying the joy of storytelling, which has made Ovid's work endure; the engagingly knotty structure is full of playful digressions and tales within tales.

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