The important timber trees of the. - Internet Archive
In Oregon, more than 140,000 non-industrial “small” forest landowners care for almost 4.7 million acres of forestland. These private landowners comprise about one-third of Oregon’s private forestland, or about 15% of Oregon’s

In Oregon, more than 140,000 non-industrial “small” forest landowners care for almost 4.7 million acres of forestland. These private landowners comprise about one-third of Oregon’s private forestland, or about 15% of Oregon’s total forestland. In 2011, the statewide timber harvest from small forests was 228 million board feet, or 7% of total statewide timber harvest. Historically, these small forests annually provide from 6% to 15% of all timber harvest statewide.

The small, non-industrial forest category is typically family-owned, and it includes private ownerships from 2 acres to 5,000 acres in size—averaging in the 20-80 acre range. These small forests are commonly referred to as: family forests, non-industrial private forests (NIPF), woodlands, woodlots, farm-forests, ranch-timberlands, or tree farms.

Small forest landowners are proud of their well-tended forests, for the aesthetics, recreation habitat, water, and timber income their forests provide. Small is a good thing across the Oregon forest landscape, because the variety of landowner objectives and management strategies—small & large, private & public—create tremendous biological diversity throughout Oregon’s 30 million acres of forestlands. The small forestlands contribute invaluable richness to the mosaic pattern of private and public forests across the state.

13.01.2018  · Importance of timber ? SAVE CANCEL. already exists ... It was important because we one Ohio from the Ohio Indians and it was one of the first states we ...

Production of furniture, as fuel, making paper and cardboard and make cases, etc. etc. It is available almost everywhere (although the amount of timber drops due to ...

The important timber trees of the United States; a manual of practical forestry for the user of foresters, students and laymen in forestry, lumbermen, farmers and ...

In Oregon, more than 140,000 non-industrial “small” forest landowners care for almost 4.7 million acres of forestland. These private landowners comprise about one-third of Oregon’s private forestland, or about 15% of Oregon’s total forestland. In 2011, the statewide timber harvest from small forests was 228 million board feet, or 7% of total statewide timber harvest. Historically, these small forests annually provide from 6% to 15% of all timber harvest statewide.

The small, non-industrial forest category is typically family-owned, and it includes private ownerships from 2 acres to 5,000 acres in size—averaging in the 20-80 acre range. These small forests are commonly referred to as: family forests, non-industrial private forests (NIPF), woodlands, woodlots, farm-forests, ranch-timberlands, or tree farms.

Small forest landowners are proud of their well-tended forests, for the aesthetics, recreation habitat, water, and timber income their forests provide. Small is a good thing across the Oregon forest landscape, because the variety of landowner objectives and management strategies—small & large, private & public—create tremendous biological diversity throughout Oregon’s 30 million acres of forestlands. The small forestlands contribute invaluable richness to the mosaic pattern of private and public forests across the state.

13.01.2018  · Importance of timber ? SAVE CANCEL. already exists ... It was important because we one Ohio from the Ohio Indians and it was one of the first states we ...

Production of furniture, as fuel, making paper and cardboard and make cases, etc. etc. It is available almost everywhere (although the amount of timber drops due to ...

The important timber trees of the United States; a manual of practical forestry for the user of foresters, students and laymen in forestry, lumbermen, farmers and ...

While logging can be carried out in a manner that reduces damage to the environment, most logging in the rainforest is very destructive. Large trees are cut down and dragged through the forest, while access roads open up remote forest areas to agriculture by poor farmers. In Africa logging workers often rely on “bushmeat” for protein. They hunt wildlife like gorillas, deer, and chimpanzees for food.

Research has found that the number of species found in logged rainforest is much lower than the number found in untouched or “primary” rainforest. Many rainforest animals cannot survive in the changed environment.

Local people often rely on harvesting wood from rainforests for firewood and building materials. In the past such practices were not particularly damaging to the ecosystem because there were relatively few people. Today, however, in areas with large human populations the sheer number of people collecting wood from a rainforest can be extremely damaging. In the 1990s, for example, the forests around the refugee camps in Central Africa (Rwanda and Congo) were virtually stripped of all trees in some areas.

In Oregon, more than 140,000 non-industrial “small” forest landowners care for almost 4.7 million acres of forestland. These private landowners comprise about one-third of Oregon’s private forestland, or about 15% of Oregon’s total forestland. In 2011, the statewide timber harvest from small forests was 228 million board feet, or 7% of total statewide timber harvest. Historically, these small forests annually provide from 6% to 15% of all timber harvest statewide.

The small, non-industrial forest category is typically family-owned, and it includes private ownerships from 2 acres to 5,000 acres in size—averaging in the 20-80 acre range. These small forests are commonly referred to as: family forests, non-industrial private forests (NIPF), woodlands, woodlots, farm-forests, ranch-timberlands, or tree farms.

Small forest landowners are proud of their well-tended forests, for the aesthetics, recreation habitat, water, and timber income their forests provide. Small is a good thing across the Oregon forest landscape, because the variety of landowner objectives and management strategies—small & large, private & public—create tremendous biological diversity throughout Oregon’s 30 million acres of forestlands. The small forestlands contribute invaluable richness to the mosaic pattern of private and public forests across the state.

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