Birds - E.J. Peiker, Nature Photographer
This bibliography is intended to embrace all fields relevant to Lollard studies. It therefore includes texts and studies about the literary, historical, cultural, and religious milieu of Lollardy as well as texts specifically about the heresy itself.The

This bibliography is intended to embrace all fields relevant to Lollard studies. It therefore includes texts and studies about the literary, historical, cultural, and religious milieu of Lollardy as well as texts specifically about the heresy itself.

The Secondary Sources are not subdivided by discipline because it has proven impossible to find categories which do anything but confuse rather than clarify the content of the sources. Some annotations are provided for help. For more help, see Pitard , “A Selected Bibliography for Lollard Studies,” indexed under “ Bibliographies and Indices ” on the Bibliography of Primary Sources .

This page is kept as one file to allow word searches of the whole list at once (use the “Find” command in your browser). Under any one author’s name, works are listed in chronological order of publication.

Brother Cadfael is the main fictional character in a series of historical murder mysteries written between 1977 and 1994 by the linguist-scholar Edith Pargeter under the name "Ellis Peters". [1] The character of Cadfael himself is a Welsh Benedictine monk living at the Abbey of St Peter and St Paul , in Shrewsbury, western England, in the first half of the 12th century. The historically accurate stories [2] are set between about 1135 and about 1145, during " The Anarchy ", the destructive contest for the crown of England between King Stephen and Empress Maud .

Cadfael, the central character of the Cadfael Chronicles, is a Benedictine monk and herbalist at the Abbey of St Peter and St Paul in Shrewsbury , the county town of the English county of Shropshire . Cadfael himself is a Welshman and uses patronymics in the Welsh fashion, naming himself Cadfael ap Meilyr ap Dafydd (Cadfael son of Meilyr son of Dafydd) as his full name.

Cadfael works closely with his friend Deputy Sheriff (later Sheriff ) Hugh Beringar of Maesbury in the north of the shire, often bending the Abbey rule to travel with or visit him. Beringar, introduced in the second novel, One Corpse Too Many (1979), is Cadfael's main ally in the pursuit of justice. Beringar swore loyalty to King Stephen when he came of age. Although initially suspicious, the king soon came to trust Beringar and appointed him Deputy Sheriff, and finally Sheriff of Shropshire. At times, Beringar has to choose between loyalty to the Crown's justice and Cadfael's private view of the injustices of the world.

This bibliography is intended to embrace all fields relevant to Lollard studies. It therefore includes texts and studies about the literary, historical, cultural, and religious milieu of Lollardy as well as texts specifically about the heresy itself.

The Secondary Sources are not subdivided by discipline because it has proven impossible to find categories which do anything but confuse rather than clarify the content of the sources. Some annotations are provided for help. For more help, see Pitard , “A Selected Bibliography for Lollard Studies,” indexed under “ Bibliographies and Indices ” on the Bibliography of Primary Sources .

This page is kept as one file to allow word searches of the whole list at once (use the “Find” command in your browser). Under any one author’s name, works are listed in chronological order of publication.

This bibliography is intended to embrace all fields relevant to Lollard studies. It therefore includes texts and studies about the literary, historical, cultural, and religious milieu of Lollardy as well as texts specifically about the heresy itself.

The Secondary Sources are not subdivided by discipline because it has proven impossible to find categories which do anything but confuse rather than clarify the content of the sources. Some annotations are provided for help. For more help, see Pitard , “A Selected Bibliography for Lollard Studies,” indexed under “ Bibliographies and Indices ” on the Bibliography of Primary Sources .

This page is kept as one file to allow word searches of the whole list at once (use the “Find” command in your browser). Under any one author’s name, works are listed in chronological order of publication.

Brother Cadfael is the main fictional character in a series of historical murder mysteries written between 1977 and 1994 by the linguist-scholar Edith Pargeter under the name "Ellis Peters". [1] The character of Cadfael himself is a Welsh Benedictine monk living at the Abbey of St Peter and St Paul , in Shrewsbury, western England, in the first half of the 12th century. The historically accurate stories [2] are set between about 1135 and about 1145, during " The Anarchy ", the destructive contest for the crown of England between King Stephen and Empress Maud .

Cadfael, the central character of the Cadfael Chronicles, is a Benedictine monk and herbalist at the Abbey of St Peter and St Paul in Shrewsbury , the county town of the English county of Shropshire . Cadfael himself is a Welshman and uses patronymics in the Welsh fashion, naming himself Cadfael ap Meilyr ap Dafydd (Cadfael son of Meilyr son of Dafydd) as his full name.

Cadfael works closely with his friend Deputy Sheriff (later Sheriff ) Hugh Beringar of Maesbury in the north of the shire, often bending the Abbey rule to travel with or visit him. Beringar, introduced in the second novel, One Corpse Too Many (1979), is Cadfael's main ally in the pursuit of justice. Beringar swore loyalty to King Stephen when he came of age. Although initially suspicious, the king soon came to trust Beringar and appointed him Deputy Sheriff, and finally Sheriff of Shropshire. At times, Beringar has to choose between loyalty to the Crown's justice and Cadfael's private view of the injustices of the world.

The Norman Conquest
The Reign of William I (most Robin Hood novels are listed here)
The Reign of William Rufus
The Wars between Stephen and Matilda
Norman Italy and Sicily

The medieval Normans were Norsemen who originally settled in northern coastal France. William of Normandy became king of England on winning the Battle of Hastings in 1066. A leader in the Saxon uprisings that followed was Hereward, said to have made his base on the Isle of Ely, surrounded by treacherous marshes. Novels about the period leading up to the Conquest and about Harold II, the Saxon king defeated by William the Conqueror, are included in this section.

Saxon resentment of the Norman aristocracy was behind the legend of Robin Hood, a Saxon outlaw said to have stolen from the rich and given to the poor. (Many Robin Hood tales are set during the reigns of Richard the Lionheart and/or King John, so see the Angevins page for those.) Another popular legend was Lady Godiva's nude horseback ride through Coventry to force her husband to remit an oppressive tax. Godiva, or Godgifu, was a real woman, the wife of Leofric, Earl of Mercia, although no documents of her time allude to the legend.

The next king, William Rufus, died in a hunting accident on August 2, 1100. Because August 2 was celebrated as Lughnasa by the pagan Celts, some have speculated he was killed as a pagan sacrifice. His brother Henry succeeded him. Henry's will named his daughter Matilda (or Maud) to succeed him, but his nephew Stephen of Blois claimed the throne, causing a civil war that ended only when the dying Stephen named Matilda's son Henry as his successor. Henry II became the first Plantagenet king.

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