Irish emigration to North America, Britain and Australia.
Starting in 2001 the JFK Trust began to compile a most comprehensive database of Irish emigration to the United States, in conjunction with the Balch Institute in Philadelphia, the Ellis Island Restoration Commission in New York and the Battery

Starting in 2001 the JFK Trust began to compile a most comprehensive database of Irish emigration to the United States, in conjunction with the Balch Institute in Philadelphia, the Ellis Island Restoration Commission in New York and the Battery Conservancy in New York.
This database is compiled directly from the original Ship’s Passenger Manifests. It records Irish, English, Scottish, and Welsh immigrants arriving at the main US ports.
For the port of New York, the database covers the years between 1846 and 1890. For Boston, Baltimore, New Orleans, and Philadelphia the database covers only the famine years between 1846 and 1851.

You can add any HTML here (admin -> Theme Options -> Promo Popup).
We suggest you create a static block and put it here using shortcode

Starting in 2001 the JFK Trust began to compile a most comprehensive database of Irish emigration to the United States, in conjunction with the Balch Institute in Philadelphia, the Ellis Island Restoration Commission in New York and the Battery Conservancy in New York.
This database is compiled directly from the original Ship’s Passenger Manifests. It records Irish, English, Scottish, and Welsh immigrants arriving at the main US ports.
For the port of New York, the database covers the years between 1846 and 1890. For Boston, Baltimore, New Orleans, and Philadelphia the database covers only the famine years between 1846 and 1851.

You can add any HTML here (admin -> Theme Options -> Promo Popup).
We suggest you create a static block and put it here using shortcode

There has long been much coming and going between Ireland and England. In fact, historians note that a scattering of Irish names existed in Liverpool as early as 1378. However, it was when Liverpool gained prominence as a port city that it became the primary access point for Irish immigrants as they made their way to England.

The Irish population in England grew gradually through the 19 th century. Many poor labourers, drovers and artisans emigrated due to economic reasons. They weren’t the only ones, however. Middle class Irish moved in and made their mark on the history of Liverpool . Michael Whitty, for example, founded the Liverpool Fire Brigade and the Liverpool Daily Post . William Brown was another prominent figure, who financed the building of the public library.

But the situation took a drastic downturn during the tragic Potato Famine which stretched from1846 to 1852. A succession of the worst potato crop failures led to massive poverty and starvation in Ireland. The potato was a staple food of the poor, especially in winter, and the loss of the crops was devastating. Over one million people lost their lives over the course of the famine.

Starting in 2001 the JFK Trust began to compile a most comprehensive database of Irish emigration to the United States, in conjunction with the Balch Institute in Philadelphia, the Ellis Island Restoration Commission in New York and the Battery Conservancy in New York.
This database is compiled directly from the original Ship’s Passenger Manifests. It records Irish, English, Scottish, and Welsh immigrants arriving at the main US ports.
For the port of New York, the database covers the years between 1846 and 1890. For Boston, Baltimore, New Orleans, and Philadelphia the database covers only the famine years between 1846 and 1851.

You can add any HTML here (admin -> Theme Options -> Promo Popup).
We suggest you create a static block and put it here using shortcode

There has long been much coming and going between Ireland and England. In fact, historians note that a scattering of Irish names existed in Liverpool as early as 1378. However, it was when Liverpool gained prominence as a port city that it became the primary access point for Irish immigrants as they made their way to England.

The Irish population in England grew gradually through the 19 th century. Many poor labourers, drovers and artisans emigrated due to economic reasons. They weren’t the only ones, however. Middle class Irish moved in and made their mark on the history of Liverpool . Michael Whitty, for example, founded the Liverpool Fire Brigade and the Liverpool Daily Post . William Brown was another prominent figure, who financed the building of the public library.

But the situation took a drastic downturn during the tragic Potato Famine which stretched from1846 to 1852. A succession of the worst potato crop failures led to massive poverty and starvation in Ireland. The potato was a staple food of the poor, especially in winter, and the loss of the crops was devastating. Over one million people lost their lives over the course of the famine.

Irish emigration is a huge subject –- historically, socially and genealogically. This is borne out by the fact that some 70million people around the world claim Irish descent. In the USA alone, there are thought to be about seven times more Irish-Americans than the current population of the island of Ireland.

To both groups, I must first make clear that my experience is with Irish records, not British, North or South American or Australian genealogy records. As such, it is beyond my knowledge to explain how to conduct genealogy research outside Ireland.

However, what you will find on this section of Irish Genealogy Toolkit will still be helpful to your family history research. It includes useful background on the 'how and why' of Irish emigration, advice on locating and using passenger lists, an overview of the Irish immigrant experience in some countries, and a list of websites where you might start your research abroad.

Starting in 2001 the JFK Trust began to compile a most comprehensive database of Irish emigration to the United States, in conjunction with the Balch Institute in Philadelphia, the Ellis Island Restoration Commission in New York and the Battery Conservancy in New York.
This database is compiled directly from the original Ship’s Passenger Manifests. It records Irish, English, Scottish, and Welsh immigrants arriving at the main US ports.
For the port of New York, the database covers the years between 1846 and 1890. For Boston, Baltimore, New Orleans, and Philadelphia the database covers only the famine years between 1846 and 1851.

You can add any HTML here (admin -> Theme Options -> Promo Popup).
We suggest you create a static block and put it here using shortcode

There has long been much coming and going between Ireland and England. In fact, historians note that a scattering of Irish names existed in Liverpool as early as 1378. However, it was when Liverpool gained prominence as a port city that it became the primary access point for Irish immigrants as they made their way to England.

The Irish population in England grew gradually through the 19 th century. Many poor labourers, drovers and artisans emigrated due to economic reasons. They weren’t the only ones, however. Middle class Irish moved in and made their mark on the history of Liverpool . Michael Whitty, for example, founded the Liverpool Fire Brigade and the Liverpool Daily Post . William Brown was another prominent figure, who financed the building of the public library.

But the situation took a drastic downturn during the tragic Potato Famine which stretched from1846 to 1852. A succession of the worst potato crop failures led to massive poverty and starvation in Ireland. The potato was a staple food of the poor, especially in winter, and the loss of the crops was devastating. Over one million people lost their lives over the course of the famine.

Irish emigration is a huge subject –- historically, socially and genealogically. This is borne out by the fact that some 70million people around the world claim Irish descent. In the USA alone, there are thought to be about seven times more Irish-Americans than the current population of the island of Ireland.

To both groups, I must first make clear that my experience is with Irish records, not British, North or South American or Australian genealogy records. As such, it is beyond my knowledge to explain how to conduct genealogy research outside Ireland.

However, what you will find on this section of Irish Genealogy Toolkit will still be helpful to your family history research. It includes useful background on the 'how and why' of Irish emigration, advice on locating and using passenger lists, an overview of the Irish immigrant experience in some countries, and a list of websites where you might start your research abroad.

'The Irish', URL: https://nzhistory.govt.nz/culture/home-away-from-home/the-irish, (Ministry for Culture and Heritage), updated 8-Dec-2014

Pre-1840 contact , Holidays and events , The arts and entertainment , Disasters , Transport , Health and welfare , Decade studies , Sport , Crime and punishment , Immigration , Lifestyle , Places , The great outdoors , Memorials

Political milestones , Protest and reform , Treaty of Waitangi , Maori leadership , Heads of State , Parliament and the people , The work of government , New Zealand in the world

Starting in 2001 the JFK Trust began to compile a most comprehensive database of Irish emigration to the United States, in conjunction with the Balch Institute in Philadelphia, the Ellis Island Restoration Commission in New York and the Battery Conservancy in New York.
This database is compiled directly from the original Ship’s Passenger Manifests. It records Irish, English, Scottish, and Welsh immigrants arriving at the main US ports.
For the port of New York, the database covers the years between 1846 and 1890. For Boston, Baltimore, New Orleans, and Philadelphia the database covers only the famine years between 1846 and 1851.

You can add any HTML here (admin -> Theme Options -> Promo Popup).
We suggest you create a static block and put it here using shortcode

There has long been much coming and going between Ireland and England. In fact, historians note that a scattering of Irish names existed in Liverpool as early as 1378. However, it was when Liverpool gained prominence as a port city that it became the primary access point for Irish immigrants as they made their way to England.

The Irish population in England grew gradually through the 19 th century. Many poor labourers, drovers and artisans emigrated due to economic reasons. They weren’t the only ones, however. Middle class Irish moved in and made their mark on the history of Liverpool . Michael Whitty, for example, founded the Liverpool Fire Brigade and the Liverpool Daily Post . William Brown was another prominent figure, who financed the building of the public library.

But the situation took a drastic downturn during the tragic Potato Famine which stretched from1846 to 1852. A succession of the worst potato crop failures led to massive poverty and starvation in Ireland. The potato was a staple food of the poor, especially in winter, and the loss of the crops was devastating. Over one million people lost their lives over the course of the famine.

Irish emigration is a huge subject –- historically, socially and genealogically. This is borne out by the fact that some 70million people around the world claim Irish descent. In the USA alone, there are thought to be about seven times more Irish-Americans than the current population of the island of Ireland.

To both groups, I must first make clear that my experience is with Irish records, not British, North or South American or Australian genealogy records. As such, it is beyond my knowledge to explain how to conduct genealogy research outside Ireland.

However, what you will find on this section of Irish Genealogy Toolkit will still be helpful to your family history research. It includes useful background on the 'how and why' of Irish emigration, advice on locating and using passenger lists, an overview of the Irish immigrant experience in some countries, and a list of websites where you might start your research abroad.

'The Irish', URL: https://nzhistory.govt.nz/culture/home-away-from-home/the-irish, (Ministry for Culture and Heritage), updated 8-Dec-2014

Pre-1840 contact , Holidays and events , The arts and entertainment , Disasters , Transport , Health and welfare , Decade studies , Sport , Crime and punishment , Immigration , Lifestyle , Places , The great outdoors , Memorials

Political milestones , Protest and reform , Treaty of Waitangi , Maori leadership , Heads of State , Parliament and the people , The work of government , New Zealand in the world

From 1848 - 1950 over 6 million adults and children emigrated from Ireland - over 2.5 million departed from Cobh county Cork Ireland , making it the single most important port of emigration. Cork was the major emigration port, although every port in Ireland was used as a point of emigration at some stage.

The port city of Liverpool, with a current population of 439,473, has long been a destination for Irish migrants. By far the greatest influx of Irish people to Liverpool came during the years of the Great Famine in the 1840s. However Irish migration into the city was not a novel occurrence. Indeed, from the early 1800s Liverpool acted as a staging post for Irish migrants on their way to North America or settling in England.

Londonderry and Belfast were important ports from the eighteenth century-ports for embarkation for thousands of emigrants from Northern Ireland who sailed to British North America and the United States.

51ktPmF4vLL