Native American Legends (Folklore, Myths, and Traditional.
Originally printed in the Western Bigfoot Society Newsletter "The Track Record". Excerpted from "Legends Beyond Psychology", by Henry James Franzoni III. Reprinted with permission

Originally printed in the Western Bigfoot Society Newsletter "The Track Record". Excerpted from "Legends Beyond Psychology", by Henry James Franzoni III. Reprinted with permission from all parties.

"There is your Big man standing there, ever waiting, ever present, like the coming of a new day," Oglala Lakota Medicine Man Pete Catches km told Mathiessen. "He is both spirit and real being, but he can also glide through the forest, like a moose with big antlers, as though the trees weren't there... I know him as my brother... I want him to touch me, just a touch, a blessing, something I could bring home to my sons and grandchildren, that I was there, that I approached him, and he touched me."

Ralph Gray Wolf, a visiting Athapaskan Indian from Alaska, told the reporter, "In our way of beliefs, they make appearances at troubled times", to help troubled Indian communities "get more in tune with Mother Earth". Bigfoot brings "signs or messages that there is a need to change, a need to cleanse," (Minn. news article, "Giant Footprint Signals a Time to Seek Change," July 23,1988).

Originally printed in the Western Bigfoot Society Newsletter "The Track Record". Excerpted from "Legends Beyond Psychology", by Henry James Franzoni III. Reprinted with permission from all parties.

"There is your Big man standing there, ever waiting, ever present, like the coming of a new day," Oglala Lakota Medicine Man Pete Catches km told Mathiessen. "He is both spirit and real being, but he can also glide through the forest, like a moose with big antlers, as though the trees weren't there... I know him as my brother... I want him to touch me, just a touch, a blessing, something I could bring home to my sons and grandchildren, that I was there, that I approached him, and he touched me."

Ralph Gray Wolf, a visiting Athapaskan Indian from Alaska, told the reporter, "In our way of beliefs, they make appearances at troubled times", to help troubled Indian communities "get more in tune with Mother Earth". Bigfoot brings "signs or messages that there is a need to change, a need to cleanse," (Minn. news article, "Giant Footprint Signals a Time to Seek Change," July 23,1988).

Choreography: Jerome Robbins
Music: Morton Gould
An energetic and brightly colored ballet that conveys the wonderful playfulness and unfettered curiosity of youth. This is one of Robbins’ truly American works, with movement in the same style as his later Broadway choreography for West Side Story.
“Exhilarating "
–New York Times

Choreography: Gerald Arpino
Music: Maurice Ravel
A magical and sensual duet about a young man on a beach enamored with an enchanting sea nymph. Performed in honor of what would have marked Joffrey co-founder Gerald Arpino’s 90th birthday.
"Effectively Sensuous" –New York Times

Choreography: Twyla Tharp
Music: Frank Sinatra
The voice of Frank Sinatra will set you swinging during this wildly popular classic that captures the dancing of the 1950’s through variously sultry, comic and glamorous vignettes, all costumed by Oscar de la Renta. "An indisputable winner " –New York Times
Production Sponsor – Jane Ellen Murray Foundation

51yaU4koGcL