Too Much Bobbie: A Farce in One Act (Classic Reprint.
By definition, farce is meant to strain the limits of credulity. But you have to at least start from someplace believable, otherwise the whole shebang collapses before that first glimmer of flop sweat on an actors brow.No question, the flop sweat abounds

By definition, farce is meant to strain the limits of credulity. But you have to at least start from someplace believable, otherwise the whole shebang collapses before that first glimmer of flop sweat on an actor's brow.

No question, the flop sweat abounds in this production of "Sex Marks the Spot," a new comedy from entertainment attorney Charles Grippo about a political sex scandal of a first-term U.S. senator (Tony Fiorentino, as understated as possible considering the circumstances).

But from the word go, Grippo makes a key misstep. "It tastes like yucky, it smells like yucky," the senator says in the first few minutes of the play, looking over his planned speech denouncing pornography. With dialogue like that, I'm not sure how you even pretend the guy resembles an actual adult human being — let alone a self-important officeholder about to come face-to-face with his hypocrisy.

By definition, farce is meant to strain the limits of credulity. But you have to at least start from someplace believable, otherwise the whole shebang collapses before that first glimmer of flop sweat on an actor's brow.

No question, the flop sweat abounds in this production of "Sex Marks the Spot," a new comedy from entertainment attorney Charles Grippo about a political sex scandal of a first-term U.S. senator (Tony Fiorentino, as understated as possible considering the circumstances).

But from the word go, Grippo makes a key misstep. "It tastes like yucky, it smells like yucky," the senator says in the first few minutes of the play, looking over his planned speech denouncing pornography. With dialogue like that, I'm not sure how you even pretend the guy resembles an actual adult human being — let alone a self-important officeholder about to come face-to-face with his hypocrisy.

Uploaded by SheliaDeRoche on August 25, 2009

D esigned to preserve the UK’s architectural heritage, the modern listed building system has its 70th birthday this year. A massive amount of redevelopment was foreseen in 1947, and no one wanted to finish what the German bombers had started and demolish even more historically important buildings.

And so a list was compiled to determine what was worth keeping and what could happily be knocked down – a list that is still maintained, these days by Historic England, formerly part of English Heritage . But how do we know we’re preserving the right things? Who are we to determine what will and won’t be valued by posterity?

While the listing of older buildings is uncontroversial (almost everything built before 1840 is listed ), modern architecture is a different story, and both inclusion and exclusion have provoked ire.

By definition, farce is meant to strain the limits of credulity. But you have to at least start from someplace believable, otherwise the whole shebang collapses before that first glimmer of flop sweat on an actor's brow.

No question, the flop sweat abounds in this production of "Sex Marks the Spot," a new comedy from entertainment attorney Charles Grippo about a political sex scandal of a first-term U.S. senator (Tony Fiorentino, as understated as possible considering the circumstances).

But from the word go, Grippo makes a key misstep. "It tastes like yucky, it smells like yucky," the senator says in the first few minutes of the play, looking over his planned speech denouncing pornography. With dialogue like that, I'm not sure how you even pretend the guy resembles an actual adult human being — let alone a self-important officeholder about to come face-to-face with his hypocrisy.

Uploaded by SheliaDeRoche on August 25, 2009

By definition, farce is meant to strain the limits of credulity. But you have to at least start from someplace believable, otherwise the whole shebang collapses before that first glimmer of flop sweat on an actor's brow.

No question, the flop sweat abounds in this production of "Sex Marks the Spot," a new comedy from entertainment attorney Charles Grippo about a political sex scandal of a first-term U.S. senator (Tony Fiorentino, as understated as possible considering the circumstances).

But from the word go, Grippo makes a key misstep. "It tastes like yucky, it smells like yucky," the senator says in the first few minutes of the play, looking over his planned speech denouncing pornography. With dialogue like that, I'm not sure how you even pretend the guy resembles an actual adult human being — let alone a self-important officeholder about to come face-to-face with his hypocrisy.

Uploaded by SheliaDeRoche on August 25, 2009

D esigned to preserve the UK’s architectural heritage, the modern listed building system has its 70th birthday this year. A massive amount of redevelopment was foreseen in 1947, and no one wanted to finish what the German bombers had started and demolish even more historically important buildings.

And so a list was compiled to determine what was worth keeping and what could happily be knocked down – a list that is still maintained, these days by Historic England, formerly part of English Heritage . But how do we know we’re preserving the right things? Who are we to determine what will and won’t be valued by posterity?

While the listing of older buildings is uncontroversial (almost everything built before 1840 is listed ), modern architecture is a different story, and both inclusion and exclusion have provoked ire.

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