Elizabeth Báthory in popular culture - Wikipedia
✪ ▐░▒ ❝  Hey you, yeah you, devushka, ❞   Extremely irritated and annoyed to the core, a growl was audible as Rider kicked down the steel door where the demonic horrible singing is beyond. Cain

✪ ▐░▒ ❝  Hey you, yeah you, devushka, ❞   Extremely irritated and annoyed to the core, a growl was audible as Rider kicked down the steel door where the demonic horrible singing is beyond. Cain felt like his ears were bleeding as he stormed through as he SCREAMED THROUGH the noise to tell the Lancer class servant to stop singing.
❝   SHUT THE FUCK UP WITH YOUR SHITTY AS HELL SINGING !!!

Jan 10-18.
Woo! Finished Emily!
First few days were basically just Emily, then the second half was overwhelmed with new sketches.
And normally I hate sketching (digitally) but I’m finding myself getting better since I’m more relaxed with it.
I’m finally just sketching out ideas to see if I like them or not (like the shitty Servamp sketch was a test if I liked an idea in my head BEFORE trying to draw it).
I’m trying to keep one foot in my comfort zone and one foot out and it seems to be working.
I dunno if I’ll finish all the sketches, but we’ll see.

“Don’t look,” Stella said, her voice as thin as the line of blood streamng from the corpse’s half-open mouth that Natasha just got done with, “don’t look, Stella.”

✪ ▐░▒ ❝  Hey you, yeah you, devushka, ❞   Extremely irritated and annoyed to the core, a growl was audible as Rider kicked down the steel door where the demonic horrible singing is beyond. Cain felt like his ears were bleeding as he stormed through as he SCREAMED THROUGH the noise to tell the Lancer class servant to stop singing.
❝   SHUT THE FUCK UP WITH YOUR SHITTY AS HELL SINGING !!!

Jan 10-18.
Woo! Finished Emily!
First few days were basically just Emily, then the second half was overwhelmed with new sketches.
And normally I hate sketching (digitally) but I’m finding myself getting better since I’m more relaxed with it.
I’m finally just sketching out ideas to see if I like them or not (like the shitty Servamp sketch was a test if I liked an idea in my head BEFORE trying to draw it).
I’m trying to keep one foot in my comfort zone and one foot out and it seems to be working.
I dunno if I’ll finish all the sketches, but we’ll see.

“Don’t look,” Stella said, her voice as thin as the line of blood streamng from the corpse’s half-open mouth that Natasha just got done with, “don’t look, Stella.”

So spoke George Bernard Shaw. But in the case of Elizabeth Bathory, one can't help feeling that his words would have been of small comfort to the next of kin. So vile were the Countess's crimes that her relatives must have feared that the family name would be eternally blackened. Indeed, it's said that after her death it was forbidden to mention the Countess's name in Hungarian society. But even if that were so, there was little the family could do to prevent her ghost from leaping into a dance macabre of preposterous proportions.

Above: The ruins of Castle Cachtice in northern Slovakia. It was here that Bathory committed many of her crimes, and where she was eventually arrested on December 29th, 1610

Unsurprisingly, the basics of the Bathory tale have provided plenty of fodder for chroniclers and balladeers. The bloody Bathory myth has had several centuries to snowball as it rolled down the Slovakian slopes into the Western imagination. Indeed, it's perhaps only those not so charming chaps Ivan the Terrible and Vlad the Impaler who can rival the Countess in the East European villain stakes. A favourite of the Hammer House of Horror, Bathory has inspired dozens of movies of dubious merit, and in 2007, two more producers threw their hats into the ring. In light of all this gothic embroidery, the job of separating fact from fiction is a fairly hefty one.

Every time you think film and fiction have history beat when it comes to violence and depravity, you learn about someone like Countess Elizabeth Báthory.

If power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely, as Lord Acton once observed , then absolute power in the hands of a psychotic, sexual sadist can unleash the hounds of hell. Such was the case of Erzsébet “Elizabeth” Báthory, a late-16th-century Hungarian countess — and the most prolific female serial killer in history, whose murderous reign historians are still trying to make sense of today.

Four hundred years ago today, in August 1614, the notorious 54-year-old royal died under house arrest in Čachtice Castle in modern-day Slovakia, having been implicated in as many as 650 deaths — mostly peasant girls and servants. Báthory’s depraved life inspired a number of stories, films and books, including possibly Bram Stoker’s Dracula ; so many, in fact, that the legends and myths surrounding the “Blood Countess” have begun to obscure the shocking, and very real, ledger of her vile deeds.

✪ ▐░▒ ❝  Hey you, yeah you, devushka, ❞   Extremely irritated and annoyed to the core, a growl was audible as Rider kicked down the steel door where the demonic horrible singing is beyond. Cain felt like his ears were bleeding as he stormed through as he SCREAMED THROUGH the noise to tell the Lancer class servant to stop singing.
❝   SHUT THE FUCK UP WITH YOUR SHITTY AS HELL SINGING !!!

Jan 10-18.
Woo! Finished Emily!
First few days were basically just Emily, then the second half was overwhelmed with new sketches.
And normally I hate sketching (digitally) but I’m finding myself getting better since I’m more relaxed with it.
I’m finally just sketching out ideas to see if I like them or not (like the shitty Servamp sketch was a test if I liked an idea in my head BEFORE trying to draw it).
I’m trying to keep one foot in my comfort zone and one foot out and it seems to be working.
I dunno if I’ll finish all the sketches, but we’ll see.

“Don’t look,” Stella said, her voice as thin as the line of blood streamng from the corpse’s half-open mouth that Natasha just got done with, “don’t look, Stella.”

So spoke George Bernard Shaw. But in the case of Elizabeth Bathory, one can't help feeling that his words would have been of small comfort to the next of kin. So vile were the Countess's crimes that her relatives must have feared that the family name would be eternally blackened. Indeed, it's said that after her death it was forbidden to mention the Countess's name in Hungarian society. But even if that were so, there was little the family could do to prevent her ghost from leaping into a dance macabre of preposterous proportions.

Above: The ruins of Castle Cachtice in northern Slovakia. It was here that Bathory committed many of her crimes, and where she was eventually arrested on December 29th, 1610

Unsurprisingly, the basics of the Bathory tale have provided plenty of fodder for chroniclers and balladeers. The bloody Bathory myth has had several centuries to snowball as it rolled down the Slovakian slopes into the Western imagination. Indeed, it's perhaps only those not so charming chaps Ivan the Terrible and Vlad the Impaler who can rival the Countess in the East European villain stakes. A favourite of the Hammer House of Horror, Bathory has inspired dozens of movies of dubious merit, and in 2007, two more producers threw their hats into the ring. In light of all this gothic embroidery, the job of separating fact from fiction is a fairly hefty one.

✪ ▐░▒ ❝  Hey you, yeah you, devushka, ❞   Extremely irritated and annoyed to the core, a growl was audible as Rider kicked down the steel door where the demonic horrible singing is beyond. Cain felt like his ears were bleeding as he stormed through as he SCREAMED THROUGH the noise to tell the Lancer class servant to stop singing.
❝   SHUT THE FUCK UP WITH YOUR SHITTY AS HELL SINGING !!!

Jan 10-18.
Woo! Finished Emily!
First few days were basically just Emily, then the second half was overwhelmed with new sketches.
And normally I hate sketching (digitally) but I’m finding myself getting better since I’m more relaxed with it.
I’m finally just sketching out ideas to see if I like them or not (like the shitty Servamp sketch was a test if I liked an idea in my head BEFORE trying to draw it).
I’m trying to keep one foot in my comfort zone and one foot out and it seems to be working.
I dunno if I’ll finish all the sketches, but we’ll see.

“Don’t look,” Stella said, her voice as thin as the line of blood streamng from the corpse’s half-open mouth that Natasha just got done with, “don’t look, Stella.”

So spoke George Bernard Shaw. But in the case of Elizabeth Bathory, one can't help feeling that his words would have been of small comfort to the next of kin. So vile were the Countess's crimes that her relatives must have feared that the family name would be eternally blackened. Indeed, it's said that after her death it was forbidden to mention the Countess's name in Hungarian society. But even if that were so, there was little the family could do to prevent her ghost from leaping into a dance macabre of preposterous proportions.

Above: The ruins of Castle Cachtice in northern Slovakia. It was here that Bathory committed many of her crimes, and where she was eventually arrested on December 29th, 1610

Unsurprisingly, the basics of the Bathory tale have provided plenty of fodder for chroniclers and balladeers. The bloody Bathory myth has had several centuries to snowball as it rolled down the Slovakian slopes into the Western imagination. Indeed, it's perhaps only those not so charming chaps Ivan the Terrible and Vlad the Impaler who can rival the Countess in the East European villain stakes. A favourite of the Hammer House of Horror, Bathory has inspired dozens of movies of dubious merit, and in 2007, two more producers threw their hats into the ring. In light of all this gothic embroidery, the job of separating fact from fiction is a fairly hefty one.

Every time you think film and fiction have history beat when it comes to violence and depravity, you learn about someone like Countess Elizabeth Báthory.

If power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely, as Lord Acton once observed , then absolute power in the hands of a psychotic, sexual sadist can unleash the hounds of hell. Such was the case of Erzsébet “Elizabeth” Báthory, a late-16th-century Hungarian countess — and the most prolific female serial killer in history, whose murderous reign historians are still trying to make sense of today.

Four hundred years ago today, in August 1614, the notorious 54-year-old royal died under house arrest in Čachtice Castle in modern-day Slovakia, having been implicated in as many as 650 deaths — mostly peasant girls and servants. Báthory’s depraved life inspired a number of stories, films and books, including possibly Bram Stoker’s Dracula ; so many, in fact, that the legends and myths surrounding the “Blood Countess” have begun to obscure the shocking, and very real, ledger of her vile deeds.

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